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Thread: Meat Contamination

  1. #1
    Member ocium's Avatar
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    Meat Contamination

    Hi all,

    Looking for some advice on meat contamination please.

    Firstly, with regards to Soft Point (lead tip) ammo, how serious an issue is meat contamination? I'm new to shooting, so I'm not really confident enough to go FMJ/Ballistic yet (shot placement accuracy).
    Do you cut a certain amount of meat around the embedded projectile as fast as possible?
    I'm no duck hunter, but surely there's a pile of lead from your bird shot in a downed duck?

    Secondly, I've just come across a new term 'bloodshot', whereby hunters cut around (and discard) meat around a bullet wound that has become contaminated with coagulated blood. What's the deal there? Is it like a Kahawai that hasn't been bled fast enough and tastes bad? Is it poisonous?
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  2. #2
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    lead poisoning from a bullet wound is nothing to be worried about. if its bruised enough to be damaged, any powdered lead in there will be gone.
    Non issue
    as for pellets in ducks, it is similar as the pellets are solid and are passed out. Lead is only an issue if its a vapour or fine powder.
    Bruised meat is damaged. why eat it?

  3. #3
    OPCz Rushy's Avatar
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    OK, firstly I would not be too concerned about any form of poisoning from the use of lead projectile in and of itself. Dealing with your second point, there is typically trauma (bruising and coagulation) that occurs around the would and that is what I have always trimmed away from the meat that I harvest. Other (non lead based) forms of poisoning are what I would encourage you to be aware of. These can typically be caused by a number of reasons such as the animal not being recovered quickly enough in the summertime, poor shot placement busting a gut bag, the meat not being being cooled quick enough, the animal being sickly, etc. if your nose tells you the meat is off then don’t harvest and similarly if your eyes tell you the meat is off (e.g. green bone) don’t harvest it. These things are generally caused by micro organisms deep within major muscle groups putrefying.

    Now that I have said enough to scare the shit out of many a novice, I will add that if you recover, gut and cool any animal quickly, you will undoubtedly get to harvest a great deal of useable meat.
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  4. #4
    Large Member mimms's Avatar
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    My grandfather used to have a bowl in the middle of the table (When eating roast rabbit or duck) for the whanau to spit the lead pellets into so he could re-load them.
    Dinnt do us nae harm derpderp!

  5. #5
    MB
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    I look at it in simple terms. Meat (muscle) is "clean" in terms of bacterial colonisation, the outside of the animal and the guts are not. A bullet passing through an animal will introduce bacteria in to the meat. Additionally, damaged meat provides a nice environment for bacteria to grow. It might be OK to eat if you're fast enough with chilling, but why risk it? I discard anything which is damaged. With ducks, I only ever find a few STEEL shot and cut out the damaged meat in the same way.
    veitnamcam and Moa Hunter like this.

  6. #6
    Member Boaraxa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mimms View Post
    My grandfather used to have a bowl in the middle of the table (When eating roast rabbit or duck) for the whanau to spit the lead pellets into so he could re-load them.
    Dinnt do us nae harm derpderp!
    It be interesting to run a rear earth magnet over the ducks especially breasts as you could then easily remove the steel shot
    The Green party putting the CON in conservation since 2017

  7. #7
    Member Max Headroom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ocium View Post
    Hi all,

    Looking for some advice on meat contamination please.

    Firstly, with regards to Soft Point (lead tip) ammo, how serious an issue is meat contamination? I'm new to shooting, so I'm not really confident enough to go FMJ/Ballistic yet (shot placement accuracy).
    Do you cut a certain amount of meat around the embedded projectile as fast as possible?
    I'm no duck hunter, but surely there's a pile of lead from your bird shot in a downed duck?

    Secondly, I've just come across a new term 'bloodshot', whereby hunters cut around (and discard) meat around a bullet wound that has become contaminated with coagulated blood. What's the deal there? Is it like a Kahawai that hasn't been bled fast enough and tastes bad? Is it poisonous?
    Here's a very simple truth, take it for what you will:

    If you've zapped a deer in the chest and dropped it, the majority of the meat is in the back legs and back steaks, well away from the site of the bullet strike. So from this point of view, no problem.
    ocium likes this.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rushy View Post
    OK, firstly I would not be too concerned about any form of poisoning from the use of lead projectile in and of itself. Dealing with your second point, there is typically trauma (bruising and coagulation) that occurs around the would and that is what I have always trimmed away from the meat that I harvest. Other (non lead based) forms of poisoning are what I would encourage you to be aware of. These can typically be caused by a number of reasons such as the animal not being recovered quickly enough in the summertime, poor shot placement busting a gut bag, the meat not being being cooled quick enough, the animal being sickly, etc. if your nose tells you the meat is off then don’t harvest and similarly if your eyes tell you the meat is off (e.g. green bone) don’t harvest it. These things are generally caused by micro organisms deep within major muscle groups putrefying.

    Now that I have said enough to scare the shit out of many a novice, I will add that if you recover, gut and cool any animal quickly, you will undoubtedly get to harvest a great deal of useable meat.
    These are very good points. Can I add the following to them : learn what a healthy animal looks like on the hoof and only shoot healthy animals in good physical body condition. For deer this means an animal that is filled out and rounded at the tail and rump, not sunken around the tail with the hip pin bones visible. 2: learn what healthy organs look like lungs, liver and the windpipe. If the animal is thin, organ colour is not right or has lesions on organs, Discard
    veitnamcam and mikee like this.
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  9. #9
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    I would be more worried about the chemicals in your supermarket meat
    veitnamcam, mikee, Pengy and 2 others like this.

  10. #10
    Member Puffin's Avatar
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    I think the possible ingestion of lead by myself, friends, and family, from eating venison I have harvested is a very real concern.
    A quick online search on lead poisoning from eating game meat will have alarm bells ringing, particularly since there is no safe level of exposure to lead.
    From personal preference I continue to use conventional lead-cored bullets over monolithic copper bullets.
    My advice would be the same as Max Headroom's: shoot your deer low and forward and leave the entire front end of the animal. This would I believe go a long way to addressing both of the points you raised.
    Moa Hunter, 2post and ocium like this.

  11. #11
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    Other things are going to kill you before lead poisonlng will except from lead dust or vapour. I've been carrying around bits of lead in my body from shotgun pellets for over 35 years and i'm still doing ok. Lead is basically inert in the body, or that's what the doctors told me anyway.

  12. #12
    Member Boaraxa's Avatar
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    Lead poisoning is a very real thing after all look at what happens to the deer once they get it in there system ...not good .
    The Green party putting the CON in conservation since 2017

  13. #13
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    Lead in the body, (ie lodged in your flesh or against bone)is different to lead in the stomach, (ie ingested). Both should be avoided.
    Remember the 7 Ps; Pryor Preparation Prevents Piss Poor Performance.

  14. #14
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    Well I reckon if you put a shoulder shot leg in an x Ray then you would find a whole lot of lead dust.

    Even a solid copper projectile wouldn't be ideal to ingest bits of.

    I think it is just part of the whole baggage that comes with hunting.

    I usually just use the shanks and leave the front legs.

  15. #15
    Member Micky Duck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Puffin View Post
    I think the possible ingestion of lead by myself, friends, and family, from eating venison I have harvested is a very real concern.
    A quick online search on lead poisoning from eating game meat will have alarm bells ringing, particularly since there is no safe level of exposure to lead.
    From personal preference I continue to use conventional lead-cored bullets over monolithic copper bullets.
    My advice would be the same as Max Headroom's: shoot your deer low and forward and leave the entire front end of the animal. This would I believe go a long way to addressing both of the points you raised.
    THE trouble with online research like that is the thinly hidded agenda of the person publishing it...... I eat right up to the bullet hole...bruised meat is not worth taking as it will be black when cooked...a little is ok in the mince bucket but a dmashed up bloodshot shoulder isnt worth the effort.
    Dama dama and Steve123 like this.

 

 

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