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Thread: tricouni's

  1. #1
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    tricouni's

    Anyone know where you can get some, or if they are still made ? Might help with the conditions I've been experiencing lately.

  2. #2
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    Women's outer wear?
    TRICOUNI



    As for the nails/cleats, no idea.
    Please excuse spelling, as finger speed is sometimes behind brain spped........ Or maybe the other wayy.....

  3. #3
    Member Tahr's Avatar
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    You can get instep cleats that tie on. Work well.

    Product Categories Crampons | KOVEA
    Last edited by Tahr; 03-10-2016 at 09:32 AM.
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  4. #4
    Member zimmer's Avatar
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    Looks like this outfit still has them.
    Tricounis - ::Lastrite Footwear
    I thought they were a thing of the past. They were all the rage in my young hunting days. My hunting boots had them around the toe area, a smaller type in the insteps, and a horse shoe arrangement on the heels. Can remember them generating sparks running down a shingle slide just on dusk up the Godley.
    Still not sure how I managed to lift my feet

  5. #5
    Member Tahr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zimmer View Post
    Looks like this outfit still has them.
    Tricounis - ::Lastrite Footwear
    I thought they were a thing of the past. They were all the rage in my young hunting days. My hunting boots had them around the toe area, a smaller type in the insteps, and a horse shoe arrangement on the heels. Can remember them generating sparks running down a shingle slide just on dusk up the Godley.
    Still not sure how I managed to lift my feet
    They worked best when combined with "clinkers". These are (or were) made of soft steel protruding strips. Rocks and stones would dig into the softer steel of the clinkers for grip, and the hard steel of the tricouni (sp) would do the opposite; they dig into the rocks for grip.

    We also used horse shoe nails, which act the same as tricounis. There is a bit of an art to attaching them.

    None of these things attach well to rubber soles. We used to try to glue and screw tricounis onto the old Paraflex rubber soled boots but they never lasted.

    Horse shoe nails work ok on the heels of rubber Bullers, but you would need to be shown how to do it.

    Hope that helps.
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  6. #6
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    They were a great addition to a hunting boot in my day - most of us used them and particularly for South Island trips - four round each side of the sole and one on each side on the instep
    Had a look at some old pictures - but not many of boots - but here is a pic of a couple of Wapiti hunters on a summer culling trip we did in the Glaisnock River valley
    John Muir and Alan Shannon of Feilding area - having a competition of who could stand the most sand fly bites - donít think we did selfies in those days so canít find one of my boots
    Tahr will remember John and Alan - sadly John may be deceased

    Last edited by time out; 03-10-2016 at 12:07 PM.

  7. #7
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    IIRC I wore out 2 sets of trices for one set of boots. And the trices are bloody hard.

    The instep (smaller ones) were brilliant for hunting in my home area where the scrub cutters had been cutting manuka and it was lying on the ground, naturally facing downhill - no more landing on your arse when you stepped on a limb in the instep!

    I think my last trices I used small self tapping screws to mount them. Drilled out the bottom nail holes fractionally. Still nailed thru the top.
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  8. #8
    SiB
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    Horseshoe nails; the "trick".

    The point of a horse shoe nail has a bevelled face. On one side. You faced the bevel to the side you wanted to move away from.

    The nail will "curl" away from the bevelled face. With hooves, tap slow and gentle and they go straight. Hit hard n fast n they can quickly curve out through the hoof wall.

    I expect the same technique would apply

    Note there are many nail sizes and profiles

    You'd want what I called the bevelled head pony nails. I can't recall the Mustaforrs coding for them sorry. Try Wrightsons or there's a major supplier on Blenhiem Rd (?) in ChCh

    Si

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by SiB View Post
    Horseshoe nails; the "trick".

    The point of a horse shoe nail has a bevelled face. On one side. You faced the bevel to the side you wanted to move away from.

    The nail will "curl" away from the bevelled face. With hooves, tap slow and gentle and they go straight. Hit hard n fast n they can quickly curve out through the hoof wall.

    I expect the same technique would apply

    Note there are many nail sizes and profiles

    You'd want what I called the bevelled head pony nails. I can't recall the Mustaforrs coding for them sorry. Try Wrightsons or there's a major supplier on Blenhiem Rd (?) in ChCh

    Si
    Yes, you want the nail point to cone out the side of the heel, then nip it to length and fold down against the outside of the heal. Exactly the same as shoeing a horse (except a black smith twists the excess length off). Some people put a steel heel plate on the Bullers' and attach it with the horse shoe nails. The nail heads sit a little proud of the steel heel plate.
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  10. #10
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    [QUOTE=zimmer;522304]Looks like this outfit still has them.
    [url=http://lastrite.co.nz/products/54

    These looked good till I saw the price, $70 for 8

  11. #11
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    Tahr and Bagheera like this.
    Real guns start with the number 3 or bigger and make two holes, one in and one out." -

  12. #12
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    [QUOTE=hillclima;522479][QUOTE=zimmer;522304]Looks like this outfit still has them.
    [url=http://lastrite.co.nz/products/54

    These looked good till I saw the price, $70 for 8 [/QUOTE]

    Swiss quality eh although they're now probably made in PRC.

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    Last edited by zimmer; 03-10-2016 at 07:45 PM. Reason: image added
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  13. #13
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    Ah those were the days !
    I used tricounis on my paraflex as tahr describes. They had the second slippriest sole under the sun and needed something but the tricounis ripped out pretty quickly. I don't think I needed them on the old leather John Bulls.

    Go MadJon ! I used those small heelplates for years till they snapped from wear. Horsehoe nails were good. Like tahr says they need a technique to get on but are very secure. They grip anywhere there's vegetation, be it wet logs, lichen, slimy rocks (specially kaimanawa streams) or muddy tracks. Not so much advantage hopping over big smooth boulders. I also used "chills" from the NZR workshops. They were like a horsehoe nail but with a massive square head about 1/4" across and lasted a lot longer. I've stopped using them in recent years because they cut up floors in huts and tents and if I use buller gumboots I can wear them inside.

    Also, the wire clip laces are really good. Either No. 8 or else the aluminium wire used for electricity pylons, which is easier to work with.

    I think rubber and sole construction is better nowdays so the tricouni is not so neccessary in most situations.
    Tahr likes this.

  14. #14
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    Did anyone get to rake themselves with their trices? I did once. Climbing over a fence (yeah had handed my rifle to my mate), slipped on the otherside, ran my right boot down the inside of my lower left leg. So true Bagheera about the hut floors - where they had proper floors!

  15. #15
    Member Tahr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zimmer View Post
    Did anyone get to rake themselves with their trices? I did once. Climbing over a fence (yeah had handed my rifle to my mate), slipped on the otherside, ran my right boot down the inside of my lower left leg. So true Bagheera about the hut floors - where they had proper floors!
    They were buggers for getting caught in stirrups. And death traps getting on and off tractors; they would catch and were slippery as hell on steel.
    And yeah, had them catch on my calf.

 

 

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