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Thread: SLR Digital camera

  1. #1
    kw
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    SLR Digital camera

    Hi all, thought I might have a go with a better camera than my cell phone, thoughts are a SLR digital any advise and what's out there for sale? Thanks all, K

  2. #2
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    A SLR is only as good as the lenses you are prepared to buy. Be prepared to invest!

  3. #3
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    The Canon EOS 1000 twin lens camera set is a good choice. I have had mine for a few years and am delighted with it. I mainly use the standard lens but the telephoto is good in the hills. Good quality at a reasonable price.
    BSA likes this.

  4. #4
    SiB
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    DSLR is a rabbit hole that like specialist shooting type pursuits, can take you very quickly into some serious $.

    Fixed lens, mirrorless? Full frame or half frame? Start simple and build slow.

    Older second hand digital gear will be half frame and quite cheap. But youíre limited to maybe 12mP.
    More modern are twice that.

    Look at the weight too. They are bulky. Not fun to drag around on a hunt.

    My 2c worth.

    I have a 12mP Canon 400 DSLR Iíll sell if youíre keen.
    mimms2 likes this.

  5. #5
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    Hi you need to give a price range !! i have a canon 80D for sale with an 18-135 lens for $1100 plus other lenses available alan 0211312194

  6. #6
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    The best camera is the one you have in your hand when you see something you want to photograph. The reason I start with this is because an SLR is big compared to other cameras. It is the camera equivalent of a magnum rifle with a 28 inch bull barrel and a chassis so heavy that it makes a bipod crucial. Sometimes that is the rifle for the job but it probably won't shoot as many deer as a rifle you can carry on the hill all day.

    I have a Canon DSLR which works amazingly and I love to use it but the only photos I really take now days with the Canon are at home or sometimes on road trips. Otherwise its just too big and bulky to carry around all the time. To really get the use of an SLR it helps to have a few different lenses as per what Bol Tackshin states above. These add to the weight and bulk of the setup.

    My partner has a small Olympus mirrorless camera, mirrorless has the same user functionality of an SLR but it doesn't have the actual mirror. The mirror really being a shutter for a film camera and not as relevant in the digital age. The Olympus still gets plenty of trips out of the house due to being more portable even if it doesn't have such a user friendly menu.
    We have also just gone halves on a gopro, it's more like having a phone camera but the main point of difference is the video stabilization, and it's so small and rugged it's really handy for outdoors activities.

    In saying all of the above I still take at least 95% of my photos with a phone these days, modern phone photography has come such a long way that the software of a phone knows how to take a better photo than most amateur SLR users.
    If you know what terms such as focal length, aperture, shutter speed and ISO refer to and how these factors will change a photo, then the features of an SLR or Mirrorless camera may be of some usefulness. If you are more of a point and shoot person who will just use their SLR set to 'auto', then there really is no point in spending the money and carrying the weight.



    So to summarise the important points:

    -There is no real point in getting an SLR unless you want to take manually composed shots where you want to alter aperture/focal length/shutter speed etc.

    -If the above does not apply, consider mirrorless with interchangeable lenses, you can achieve same results from a simpler lighter camera.

    -Also consider a gopro as a different direction if what I have said above has discouraged you.



    I do feel like what I have written isn't very encouraging, and I want to be clear that it is not my intention to discourage as SLR photography can be very rewarding. It is intended more as a reality check not only from someone that has been there and done it but also as someone that has seen their share of others sink plenty $ into an SLR and get bored with it in the first few weeks.

    If you are still keen to give it a try after considering all of the above, I would suggest starting with something 2nd hand but hardly used off trodme, there will be no shortage of options and I am sure others on the forum in addition to myself will be happy to provide guidance on what is a good deal and what not.
    6x47, SixtyTen, svt40 and 1 others like this.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by SiB View Post
    DSLR is a rabbit hole that like specialist shooting type pursuits, can take you very quickly into some serious $.

    Fixed lens, mirrorless? Full frame or half frame? Start simple and build slow.

    Older second hand digital gear will be half frame and quite cheap. But you’re limited to maybe 12mP.
    More modern are twice that.

    Look at the weight too. They are bulky. Not fun to drag around on a hunt.

    My 2c worth.

    I have a 12mP Canon 400 DSLR I’ll sell if you’re keen.
    All good advice from SiB. Its also amazing what a cellphone camera can do these days. A huge chunk of the camera market has been eaten away by cellphones and deservedly so, small, light, convenient and their performance for the size is outstanding.

    Ive got a m4/3 setup with a bunch of lenses im very happy with, its very portable. Im not selling but do recommend lots of reading online to understand the market before you throw any big $ at anything. Something like the 80D + 18-135 combo Alan has above would be worth a look, a lot of flexibility in one lens there.

  8. #8
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    I also have the Canon 80D.
    Great camera, but not weather sealed.
    If you want a camera to take away out in the bush then you should perhaps be looking for weather sealed camera and lenses.
    None of these are cheap!
    I just bought the Canon 70-300 IS II lens ($900ish). Great wee lens. Instant focus (they have a new 'nano' motor in the lens to drive the focus mechanism).
    These things lock onto a moving target (subject) quicker than an eye blink.
    So an 80D is a nice camera. The 18-135 lens comes in 3 versions (all are good, later is better). That's a good lens too, but I 'needed' more length for distant objects...hence the 70-300.
    Depends on how much you want to spend...it's a slippery slope down another rabbit hole.
    Check out Ken Rockwell for reviews of cameras, and lenses.
    https://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/reviews.htm

  9. #9
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    Got a 550D that I would be prepared to sell, two lenses (the package ones) comes with bag as well.

  10. #10
    John Galt Sr.
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    OK... Nikon guy here. To hell with all you cannon fans.
    I find that the controls come easier to hand than the cannons, but then I've had nikon since 35mm days so... If you're starting from zero there probably isn't much in it.

    Need to define your objective. "Better than your cellphone", could be a new cellphone... I believe they even make full-frame compacts now.

    Any of the JBhifi/harvey norman kits are very average. Average bodies, average lenses.

    Any lens that covers a range (and the wider the range the worse it gets) is a compromise. A fixed 50mm will be more accurate than a 30-120mm, set at 50. I would ideally avoid zoom-range lenses, but they are convinient until they wear and lose collimation.

    Unless you're getting super-anal then most sensors now available will meet the need. You don't need full frame until you start spending proper money on lenses.
    You can probably ignore "megapixels" as marketing jib.

    If buying second hand then take note of the shutter count. Consumer bodies will die sooner than commercial ones, but people who buy commercial will generally sell theirs with more % life left.
    Of course this isn't a given and someone who nanna's their harvey special might see a higher count than the guy who takes his D1 skydiving and rockclimbing...

    Need to define your objective. Old japanese glass beats new chinese glass all day. Lens servos are one more thing to go wrong (AF) but most new cameras don't have the microprism ring of the old filmys so focusing by eye is a challenge especially if you're blind like me.

    I like lenses with tight apertures (high f-stop number, 22 is good)
    Higher number generally indicates lower abberation=better quality.

    Brands I would consider for a body, in order, are Nikon, Olympus, Cannon. Lenses from sigma or nikkor.
    Not to say any other brand wont serve you well, just thems my picks.
    hotbarrels and SkiHunt like this.
    "Did you know deer aren't bulletproof, and they're made of food?" - Joe Rogan
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  11. #11
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    All of the above is good advice, and I will add the following:
    1. No phone camera on the planet will achieve the picture quality of a mid price or better DSLR or mirrorless camera (and I have an iPhone 12Pro)
    2. This is particularly true if you are in low light situations eg in the bush hunting.
    3. Similar situation with the point and shoots which have largely been killed off by the improved phone cameras - once you get into low light, the picture quality drops off dramatically.
    4. You need to define what it is you want to achieve in your photography. As others have said, you may start out with one direction in mind and then as your skill and interest changes, your kit will change.
    5. As technology is changing, camera bodies are largely a consumable (scary as that may be), but lenses are an investment. Like scopes, there is no substitute for good glass.
    6. Don't get caught up in the more megapixel is better sales pitch. Unless you are printing murals, 45MP is an overkill. On screen and 6x4 prints are fine at 12MP. That said, most entry level DSLR/Mirrorless are 20MP these days. More megapixels do come in handy if you are heavily cropping your images. This can sometimes be used to compensate for a lack of focal length in your lens.
    7. I recommend you pay a visit to Photo Warehouse in CHCH. They stock all the major brands. Because you are starting out with no bias, look for the camera bodies that best suits you ergonomically, then go away and look into specs. Don't impulse buy.
    8. There are pro's and con's for DSLR v mirrorless. That is a book all of its own.
    9. In terms of brands, Cannon has a much stronger 'consumer' range, and a greater lens offering from cheap to professional. Nikon has a smaller range, but is my brand of choice for the past 35years.
    10. In terms of Nikon, for someone starting out on a limited budget I would recommend the D5600 due to its extremely light weight, and some of the kit lenses they come with are very good. If you do your bit, picture quality is stunning. I have one as a carry camera when hunting, but use a D850 for the more creative stuff. If you are happy looking at an electronic view finder and your budget stretches that far, you can cross over into the mirrorless, where I would recommend a X50 kit. Same sensor, but being mirrorless your max frame rate goes up, and the video functionality improves, but being an electronic viewfinder (EV) the battery performance is not as good as the D5600. Just be aware that the Nikon mirrorless run a different lens format to the DSLR. You can get a converter to run DSLR lenses on the mirrorless, but not the other way around.
    11. Lastly, if you do decided to pursue photography, you will never look at the word the same again. You will start to see rather than just look.
    GravelBen, Swanny and mimms2 like this.

  12. #12
    John Galt Sr.
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    Quote Originally Posted by hotbarrels View Post
    2\10. In terms of Nikon, for someone starting out on a limited budget I would recommend the D5600
    @OP... Camera series numbering is another thing you'll want to look at. I think cannon is same as nikon. Less numbers=better=expensiver. D5600<D500<D5

    I wouldn't recommend any of the 4-number jobbies. They're toys. (Although I think I have a 5xxx buried somewhere, but don't tell anyone)
    If that's your budget and level of interest, then sure, but at least get a 7xxxx.

    but if you're more than half-serious then look to the 3-numbers and they may well see you out, or you may decide you need a 2-digit.
    You'll lose less if resale too.
    Buy once cry once, you get what you pay for and all that.
    "Did you know deer aren't bulletproof, and they're made of food?" - Joe Rogan
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  13. #13
    BSA
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    Quote Originally Posted by gundoc View Post
    The Canon EOS 1000 twin lens camera set is a good choice. I have had mine for a few years and am delighted with it. I mainly use the standard lens but the telephoto is good in the hills. Good quality at a reasonable price.
    Agreed have taken some excellent photos with mine if anything would be tempted on 100-300 Macro to compliment the lenses that came with it.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mimms2 View Post
    I wouldn't recommend any of the 4-number jobbies. They're toys. .
    I disagree. The picture quality out of the 5xxx series Nikon's is excellent, and far from a toy. Sure, they are not as robust as my D850, but at a 1/5 of the price, that is to be expected. I've carried mine around hunting for a couple of years now without issue. Don't be put off by the model number.
    That would be like saying that a Tikka is a toy because it is the lower optioned and priced stable mate of a Sako.
    6x47 likes this.

  15. #15
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    Thanks for this solution! I also have the same case.

 

 

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