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Thread: Return to Zero

  1. #1
    Member hillclima's Avatar
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    Return to Zero

    Hi, just curious as to whether you guys would class this as returning to zero for this scope. I did the 10 click square at 100yrds and you can see the results in the photo


  2. #2
    Impure Lead Flinger
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    Try 2209 or 2213 myt give better speed...

    Seems reasonable, most scopes have a slight movement in the low end and generally it will and can move zero round about 1/2 moa but under 400m its not an issue.....

    What kind of scope is it? Try goin a click or two past the setting u want then back again

  3. #3
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    In my opinion, shooting a box test is a complete waste of ammo. Unless you have 100% perfect conditions, a rifle with amazing REPEATABLE accuracy, a concrete bench and BR rests blah blah blah the shooter/rifle will introduce WAY more error into the test than the scope will. Therefore the test will be completely inconclusive.

    Best (only) way to do it is to mount the scope to something solid that just won’t move i.e. concrete bench and set a test chart at exactly 100 yards/metres depending on your click values. Look through the scope and dial up across as much as you like through the whole adjustment range. Ensure that your parallax is set properly before the test also.

    Very few people are set up to do this correctly.

    As BB mentioned backlash will be evident in a lot if not most scopes so going past your zero and then coming back to it from the same direction can help.

    The ONLY 2 scopes that I have personally tested that were perfect are my S&B and my NF.

  4. #4
    Caretaker Wildman's Avatar
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    Strange that you could be forgiven in thinking that it is not returning to zero on the horizontal and not vertical.... What happens if you go round again? Is the slight variation cumlative?

    Buy one of these:
    Grandslam
    Superslam

  5. #5
    Caretaker Wildman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Proudkiwi View Post
    In my opinion, shooting a box test is a complete waste of ammo. Unless you have 100% perfect conditions, a rifle with amazing REPEATABLE accuracy, a concrete bench and BR rests blah blah blah the shooter/rifle will introduce WAY more error into the test than the scope will. Therefore the test will be completely inconclusive.

    Best (only) way to do it is to mount the scope to something solid that just won’t move i.e. concrete bench and set a test chart at exactly 100 yards/metres depending on your click values. Look through the scope and dial up across as much as you like through the whole adjustment range. Ensure that your parallax is set properly before the test also.

    Very few people are set up to do this correctly.

    As BB mentioned backlash will be evident in a lot if not most scopes so going past your zero and then coming back to it from the same direction can help.

    The ONLY 2 scopes that I have personally tested that were perfect are my S&B and my NF.

    His groups seem consistant though...

  6. #6
    Member hillclima's Avatar
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    Speed is slow but I'm happy with it for now as I've tried 5 different poweders and same happens with every one, as speed goes up accuracy goes to crap. Good to know about the 1/2 MOA movement, I wasn't sure what others got so that's good to know and will try goin past and coming back

    I appreciate what you are say Proudkiwi, but if I was worried about wasting ammo I would have given up shooting a long time ago and I wanted to see what happened

    Cumilative, I was wondering the same, looks like I may have to go back to the range and waste some more ammo I think. And I've been eyeing up one of these for my other project idea Weaver 4-20X50 Super Slam Euro Style Riflescope SF Dual-X Reticle Matte - Natchez Shooters Supplies

  7. #7
    R93
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    Looks pretty good to me hillclima. I set mine in a set of v blocks, it doesnt have to be 100yrd/m unless your testing click values and I do that when zeroing anyway.

  8. #8
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    When dialing always finish off turning 3-4 clicks clockwise. This loads up the spring that moves the reticule. When dialing up my first shot would always hit a bit low, the next shots hitting in the right spot. I read the clockwise thing on the internet and tried it one day while showing a skeptic I could shoot accurately out to 500. Work perfectly first shot on target each time. I'm no expert, but it worked for me. Cheers Ackley

  9. #9
    Caretaker jakewire's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Proudkiwi View Post
    In my opinion, shooting a box test is a complete waste of ammo. Unless you have 100% perfect conditions, a rifle with amazing REPEATABLE accuracy, a concrete bench and BR rests blah blah blah the shooter/rifle will introduce WAY more error into the test than the scope will. Therefore the test will be completely inconclusive.

    Best (only) way to do it is to mount the scope to something solid that just won’t move i.e. concrete bench and set a test chart at exactly 100 yards/metres depending on your click values. Look through the scope and dial up across as much as you like through the whole adjustment range. Ensure that your parallax is set properly before the test also.

    Very few people are set up to do this correctly.

    As BB mentioned backlash will be evident in a lot if not most scopes so going past your zero and then coming back to it from the same direction can help.

    The ONLY 2 scopes that I have personally tested that were perfect are my S&B and my NF.
    I've always thought this.
    I can see 11 shots there, maybe there are more.
    To actually have faith in this type of test you would have to be 100% confident you can put your bullets ontop of each other,and your rifle can also do it.
    Seems to me , if they are inch squares, your about 1/2 inch away from your first group, that's damn good shooting, well done.

  10. #10
    L.R
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    Quote Originally Posted by Proudkiwi View Post
    In my opinion, shooting a box test is a complete waste of ammo. Unless you have 100% perfect conditions, a rifle with amazing REPEATABLE accuracy, a concrete bench and BR rests blah blah blah the shooter/rifle will introduce WAY more error into the test than the scope will. Therefore the test will be completely inconclusive.

    Best (only) way to do it is to mount the scope to something solid that just won’t move i.e. concrete bench and set a test chart at exactly 100 yards/metres depending on your click values. Look through the scope and dial up across as much as you like through the whole adjustment range. Ensure that your parallax is set properly before the test also.

    Very few people are set up to do this correctly.

    As BB mentioned backlash will be evident in a lot if not most scopes so going past your zero and then coming back to it from the same direction can help.

    The ONLY 2 scopes that I have personally tested that were perfect are my S&B and my NF.
    Yep I agree i wouldn't be basing the scopes performance off that test, far to much margin for error, do the bench test if you want to confirm your return to zero. There are very few scope brands out there that you can be sure will track perfectly and return to zero.

  11. #11
    Caretaker Wildman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakewire View Post
    I've always thought this.
    I can see 11 shots there, maybe there are more.
    To actually have faith in this type of test you would have to be 100% confident you can put your bullets ontop of each other,and your rifle can also do it.
    Seems to me , if they are inch squares, your about 1/2 inch away from your first group, that's damn good shooting, well done.
    I shall remember this quote...

  12. #12
    Member 199p's Avatar
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    Good shooting mate

  13. #13
    Member hillclima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ackley View Post
    When dialing always finish off turning 3-4 clicks clockwise. This loads up the spring that moves the reticule. When dialing up my first shot would always hit a bit low, the next shots hitting in the right spot. I read the clockwise thing on the internet and tried it one day while showing a skeptic I could shoot accurately out to 500. Work perfectly first shot on target each time. I'm no expert, but it worked for me. Cheers Ackley
    Hmm, thanks for the tip, will try that next time as well

  14. #14
    Member hillclima's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakewire View Post
    I've always thought this.
    I can see 11 shots there, maybe there are more.
    To actually have faith in this type of test you would have to be 100% confident you can put your bullets ontop of each other,and your rifle can also do it.
    Seems to me , if they are inch squares, your about 1/2 inch away from your first group, that's damn good shooting, well done.
    Yep, Inch square, was 12 shots as one on edge of paper. Thanks for the feedback

  15. #15
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    I suspect itís just some backlash like others have said. Being an engineer in a former life I soon learn to approach all machine operations on a lathe or mill from the same direction i.e. left to right to minimise this error.

    So what does this mean for your scope?

    Well if I had to dial in 8.25MOA for say a 525y shot, I'd quickly wind my dial up past 9.0MOA and then slowly click it back down to it reads 8.25MOA.

    When you've taken the shot you can simply wind straight down to zero as you're ''coming down'' in the same direction of travel i.e. never wind down to -1.0MOA and then up to 0.0MOA or you induce the error. The reason why you alway ''come down'' to set you dials is that the errector spring is on the oposite side to the dial, so it responds better when turned that way and is being set against a compressive force.

    All mechanical devices have backlash, just some are better than others...but itís still there.

    kj

 

 

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