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Thread: Trekking Poles

  1. #1
    Member Ground Control's Avatar
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    Trekking Poles

    My knees are about buggered and Ive been seeing more people using Trekking Poles over the last few years .
    Can anyone give me the Good , the Bad and the Ugly on their usefulness and what models/make to look for .

    Ken
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    FALL IN LOVE WITH THE NUMBERS , NOT THE IDEA

  2. #2
    ebf
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    The gnome returns ! ebf's Avatar
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    Use em They save your knees and you use 20-30 % less energy using 2 poles.

    Weight difference between alu and carbon not worth it in my opinion.

    Make sure you get ones with decent locks on the sections, and use a rubber cap - the tungsten/metal tip does serious damage to tracks.
    Viva la Howa ! R.I.P. Toby
    Black rifles matter...

  3. #3
    Member stug's Avatar
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    Yep trekking poles will make a huge difference, mainly going uphill and downhill, not so much along the flats. With a pack on and poles I can go up hills without resting that I would need to take several rests on without poles.
    Poles are like anything else, you get what you pay for. Probably buy a cheap pair off trademe to check you like them, then upgrade if you like them.
    Leki were one of the first ones and good quality, but there are other good brands out there too.

  4. #4
    Member mawzer308's Avatar
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    They definitely save the knees and if you can find one or make one with a notch at the top they can be a useful shooting stick too. The best ones are the lightweight carbon fibre type that collapse. So if you don't require it you can stow it with relative ease.

  5. #5
    Member GravelBen's Avatar
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    As others have said they make a big difference on the hills, especially with a heavy pack. They get in the way bush-bashing though, I often put them away for that.

    I much prefer external clamps to twist-lock designs, have had a few twist-locks crap out either by jamming up or loosening themselves off.

  6. #6
    Member Mathias's Avatar
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    Bloody good and if using 2 of 'em they make good crossed shooting sticks.

  7. #7
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    They are awesome when tramping with a heavy pack or over uneven ground, even one pole makes a huge difference to stability and taking pressure of knees and ankles.
    I haven't taken one hunting, but am seriously considering it. I'm thinking it would be stowed away while hunting but be used when carrying out a load of venison and no longer hunting, or on the downhill trip on the way out.

  8. #8
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    Thanks ground control for the great question and everyone for your answers, I think I’ll get some now.
    Remember the 7 Ps; Pryor Preparation Prevents Piss Poor Performance.

  9. #9
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    Cutting a Manuka pole works pretty good too, ideally one with a small fork or two to use as a rifle rest

    Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
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  10. #10
    Hunter gatherer dannyb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brakelie View Post
    Cutting a Manuka pole works pretty good too, ideally one with a small fork or two to use as a rifle rest

    Sent from my SM-G935F using Tapatalk
    no need for a fork just rest your rifle on your hand holding the pole at whatever height you need to make your shot

  11. #11
    Member Ground Control's Avatar
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    I think I’d already made up my mind to try some when I asked the question , but the overwhelming positive response has pushed me into action and order some , they are already on their way to my door .

    Cheers fellas

    Ken
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    FALL IN LOVE WITH THE NUMBERS , NOT THE IDEA

  12. #12
    Member Shearer's Avatar
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    https://www.aliexpress.com/item/1Pai...27424c4dCkAOsI
    I have used poles for about 10 years and have had a pair of these for about the last 18 months. Cheap, light and work just as well as the "brand" names.
    gadgetman likes this.
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  13. #13
    Member ROKTOY's Avatar
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    I've used a single pole for a year or so now, I initially started using one to encourage my young boy to use one as I felt it would help him negotiate steps/rocks banks etc. when we were tramping, Being an average 8 year old his legs often weren't as long as the step required and add a pack to that and he was often looking to me for support for balance, now with a walking pole he is tackling most everything on his own.
    I have a set with a Tee style handle and find it more stable (for me) especially on down hill stuff. The flat handle is a more natural grip for me when strolling on the flats. I also use mine as a tent pole in conjunction with my fly/tarp for camping.
    Leki, Fizan and Macpac poles in camping box.

  14. #14
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    Massdrop often has good deals on trekking poles

  15. #15
    Not just an internet expert... The Claw's Avatar
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    I have a set of Black Diamond Alpine Cork Carbon poles. They are awesome, strong and sturdy for their weight. Not particularly cheap but they are useful for heaps of things (snowshoeing, climbing approaches, ski touring etc) not just hunting.

    I got them from a online shop out of Germany (exxposed.com) which was way cheaper than here along with a chuck of ice climbing gear that I couldn't find here.

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