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  1. #1
    Member Shooter's Avatar
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    Filleting knife straight or curved?

    Well I have only ever used a straight filleting knife as that was what my father used and so on... Thing is I have never met anyone else who does so am thinking "what is the difference" am I missing out on something spectacular?
    "Professionals are predictable but the world is full of dangerous amateurs"

  2. #2
    Impure Lead Flinger
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    Na way they all cut....

    Only spectacular fillet knife I rekon is those bullnose jobbys... I find the bullnose way more easier than a sharp point for tracing down the side of a groper or bluenose frame for example

  3. #3
    Member Shooter's Avatar
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    Thought as much, "don't fix it if it's not broken"

    There must be pros and cons for each. I had a scout around via google but nothing to clear on it all.
    "Professionals are predictable but the world is full of dangerous amateurs"

  4. #4
    Almost literate. veitnamcam's Avatar
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    Top standard generic filleting knife
    bottom standard generic trimming knife


    Filleting knife is longer with a deeper blade and relatively thin back to give flex and a rounded tip to ride the main bone.
    used properly and sharp(of course) the flex and rounded tip will let you glide over bones on each side of the main bone getting great recovery.
    Trimming knife is obviously shorter and pointier to provide a stiff accurate cut for trimming out pin bones blood spot etc.

    I use a filleting knife on anything bigger than say a 30cm snapper but find the trimming knife good for smaller flat fish like terakie and flounder.
    If your the kind of person that fillets in one cut from behind the gills and over the main bone in one swoop dis regard all the above,best you use a machete
    "Hunting and fishing" fucking over licenced firearms owners since ages ago.

  5. #5
    Fisher and Hunter leathel's Avatar
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    The one I use the most is strait with a flexable blade, Have a curved one similar sized but dont like it, For the bigger things I have a longer wider firm bladed knife but still strait
    Fishing ... Hunting its all good

  6. #6
    Almost literate. veitnamcam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by leathel View Post
    The one I use the most is strait with a flexable blade, Have a curved one similar sized but dont like it, For the bigger things I have a longer wider firm bladed knife but still strait
    Straight is all good,the only reason for the rounded end is for longer edge life running along the bone.Most of the knife is straight until it is worn from improper sharpening technique.
    A wee bit of flex and a bit of depth to the blade defiantly makes it easier to get as much flesh of as possible.
    As BB said they all cut but some make it easier
    "Hunting and fishing" fucking over licenced firearms owners since ages ago.

  7. #7
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    My fillet knife ,was a serrated kitchen knife that had a 5 year warranty on the blade.So figured it was probably good steel would probably make a fine fillet knife after a hour shaping with the bench grinder .
    Cost about $4 from M10


    Blade is about 200mm

  8. #8
    Member Shooter's Avatar
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    Thats a bloody good idea Chris. I bet it would have a good flex on it too.
    "Professionals are predictable but the world is full of dangerous amateurs"

  9. #9
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    yes & seems to do the job OK shooter ,doesn't leave anything on the fish frame.

 

 

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