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Thread: Aviation enthusiast thread

  1. #1336
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scouser View Post
    So your dad was a "rear gunner"......DNA test for you laddie.....
    Lousy attempt at humour champ....
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  2. #1337
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    ‘nother random one from 09June44, D-Day +3.
    Father did an ASR Sweep of the Normandy beachheads in this Beaufighter. Normally accompanied by one other and a Vickers Warwick with a lifeboat slung under the belly to drop close to downed airmen.

    Name:  E4846040-D07F-4322-BC98-F41ED7438966.jpeg
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    74 years ago today

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  3. #1338
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    Quote Originally Posted by shift14 View Post
    Lousy attempt at humour champ....
    Apologies Bev, no offence intended.....
    While I might not be as good as I once was, Im as good once as I ever was!

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  4. #1339
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    Great photo.

    Look at the dihedral on those horizontal stabilizers... raises a lot of questions regarding why that should be necessary.

    I've always liked the look of the Beaufighters and it would be great to see one flying again. Do you have many other photos?
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  5. #1340
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    Yeah good point mate...reason ....the prop-wash created by props destabilizes the airflow over the horizontal stabilizer,....the dihedral,designed to mitigate that......wing trim tabs vortex generators,weren’t a feature beach in those days,.....they would of helped


    Quote..
    Look at the dihedral on those horizontal stabilizers... raises a lot of questions regarding why that should be necessary.
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    It's not the mountain we conquer,but ourselves.....Sir Edmund Hillary

  6. #1341
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    Quote Originally Posted by planenutz View Post
    Great photo.

    Look at the dihedral on those horizontal stabilizers... raises a lot of questions regarding why that should be necessary.

    I've always liked the look of the Beaufighters and it would be great to see one flying again. Do you have many other photos?
    Yes, as @330driver says, it was to improve longitudinal stability, especially in a turn. Tailplane span was increased and the dihedral introduced from the Mk I onwards.

    There a Beaufighter Mk X under restoration to flying condition at Duxford in the UK. It’s unbelievable. The big problem is the engines. Early versions of the Bristol Hercules engines in good nick are scarce. They don’t have much in common with later version used in the Bristol Frieghter.
    I got quite a few pics, including gun camera stills.
    We’ve visited Banff and Dallachy in northern Scotland were they operated from across the North Sea to Norway to attack shipping in the fjords. As soon as a lady up there heard my acccent, she directed me to the airfield., quite a few family of Squadron members have made the trip.

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  7. #1342
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scouser View Post
    Apologies Bev, no offence intended.....
    All good
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  8. #1343
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    Quote Originally Posted by shift14 View Post
    We’ve visited Banff and Dallachy in northern Scotland were they operated from across the North Sea to Norway to attack shipping in the fjords. As soon as a lady up there heard my acccent, she directed me to the airfield., quite a few family of Squadron members have made the trip.
    B
    In quiet moments I sometimes reflect on the achievements of that generation of young lads. Being given an overloaded aircraft with sometimes dubious flying qualities and then pointing it to sea or to hostile skies over Europe, in bad weather, at night, to fight for your life... immeasurable respect.

  9. #1344
    MIA somewhere in Nam 300CALMAN's Avatar
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    Such a shame these never went into service. Looks like the brother of "Firefox" and as dangerous as a SU-34.

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  10. #1345
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    Quote Originally Posted by planenutz View Post
    In quiet moments I sometimes reflect on the achievements of that generation of young lads. Being given an overloaded aircraft with sometimes dubious flying qualities and then pointing it to sea or to hostile skies over Europe, in bad weather, at night, to fight for your life... immeasurable respect.
    Agreed, and as much as I hate to say it hats off to the yanks for doing it in the daylight when they could be seen.
    it would be interesting to see what would happen today with our generation. they are definitely not cut from the same cloth, but I still reckon you'd find the people to step up. I may be wrong there but I certainly hope I never find out.
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  11. #1346
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  12. #1347
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    Your wrong.....and it’s purely hypothetical....back in the 70,s when I started flying,it was VFR only,VFR on top,special VFR Clearance departures,cruise clearances,Loran and omega,all VOR/NDB Approaches,etc,.......it is certainly true we are wrapped in cotton wool these days,but with that comes it own sets of issues we have created,which are unique to how we operated anymore.

    I would agree,I’m not of the same cloth of earlier generations,as I believe current day abinitio pilots are not of my cloth....,..they haven’t done the hard yards,money gets them anything they want......but when pushed or given certain parameters to fly,...I reckon we would all step up to the task......I’m in the buisness,been flying for 38 yrs,I see no reason why my attitude would not be the same as earlier generations.......

    Please don’t take this personally,it s just my opinion ......but certainly true,...KUDO,s to these fanastaic pilots who put everything on the line ....their lives,country,whanau,and the many Kiwi pilots involved who were instrumental in the outcome......Whakaute!

    My uncle flew for TEAL,....he carried a sextant,used it all the time when flying.....it was given to me on his passing,.I have learned to use it,from his teaching and others.......a bygone era!,

    Quote Originally Posted by csmiffy View Post
    Agreed, and as much as I hate to say it hats off to the yanks for doing it in the daylight when they could be seen.
    it would be interesting to see what would happen today with our generation. they are definitely not cut from the same cloth, but I still reckon you'd find the people to step up. I may be wrong there but I certainly hope I never find out.
    gadgetman, Scouser and csmiffy like this.
    It's not the mountain we conquer,but ourselves.....Sir Edmund Hillary

  13. #1348
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    Quote Originally Posted by csmiffy View Post
    Agreed, and as much as I hate to say it hats off to the yanks for doing it in the daylight when they could be seen.
    it would be interesting to see what would happen today with our generation. they are definitely not cut from the same cloth, but I still reckon you'd find the people to step up. I may be wrong there but I certainly hope I never find out.
    The American bombers were much heavier armoured and were deployed more during daylight hours. The drawback was they could not carry such a heavy payload. The British aircraft were less armoured and could carry a greater payload so were deployed more at night.

    Push comes to shove the young of today would step up. The youth of the era that stepped up in the past had a similar reputation to the youth of today in the eyes of their forebears.
    Savage1, A330driver and csmiffy like this.
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  14. #1349
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    Quote Originally Posted by A330driver View Post
    Your wrong.....and it’s purely hypothetical....back in the 70,s when I started flying,it was VFR only,VFR on top,special VFR Clearance departures,cruise clearances,Loran and omega,all VOR/NDB Approaches,etc,.......it is certainly true we are wrapped in cotton wool these days,but with that comes it own sets of issues we have created,which are unique to how we operated anymore.

    I would agree,I’m not of the same cloth of earlier generations,as I believe current day abinitio pilots are not of my cloth....,..they haven’t done the hard yards,money gets them anything they want......but when pushed or given certain parameters to fly,...I reckon we would all step up to the task......I’m in the buisness,been flying for 38 yrs,I see no reason why my attitude would not be the same as earlier generations.......

    Please don’t take this personally,it s just my opinion ......but certainly true,...KUDO,s to these fanastaic pilots who put everything on the line ....their lives,country,whanau,and the many Kiwi pilots involved who were instrumental in the outcome......Whakaute!

    My uncle flew for TEAL,....he carried a sextant,used it all the time when flying.....it was given to me on his passing,.I have learned to use it,from his teaching and others.......a bygone era!,
    @A330driver no wuckas there. Definitely don't take it personally. You are basically saying what I meant by not of the same cloth. Probably a bit literal comparing it to the original situation but the same nonetheless.
    If its electronic, they'd be all over it. Back to basics not so much.

  15. #1350
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    Massive overhaul to keep Air Force C-130 flying for 80 years into 2030s



    he Air Force plans to fly its war-tested 1950s-era C-130 aircraft well into the 2030s and beyond through a sweeping, multi-pronged technical overhaul, designed to enable the propeller-flown aircraft to perform its high-risk troop transport and combat support missions for decades to come.

    While there have been many innovations, upgrades and technological enhancements to the aircraft since it originally surfaced in the mid-1950s, the historic cargo plane may wind up flying for more than 80 years, according to current Air Force plans.

    The service is giving the platform new propeller technology, radios, glass cockpit touchscreen displays, digital avionics, collision avoidance technology and reinforced "wing-boxes," service officials said.

    The airframes themselves are a key focal point of the effort, Air Force developers explain, which includes replacing and reinforcing the “center wingbox” of the aircraft where the wings mount to the fuselage.

    “The C-130 center wing box replacement program replaces time-limited center wing boxes on applicable variants of the C-130s. Center wing box installations are underway at Warner Robins Air Logistics Center for legacy C-130s and C-130Js as flight hours require,” Maj. Emily Grabowski, Air Force spokeswoman, told Warrior Maven.

    As for when a C-130 needs maintenance upgrade to preserve and maintain service life, the Air Force uses an assessment metric referred to as “equivalent baseline hours.” The wing-boxes are changed once the aircraft reaches a certain “severity factor” in its operational service time.

    This is necessary because the wear and tear or impact of missions upon and airplane can vary greatly depending upon a range of factors such as the altitude at which a plane is flying, Air Force weapons developers said.

    “Low-level flight may be three to four times the severity factor of flying at a higher level,” one senior Air Force official told Warrior.

    Called an Avionics Modernization Program by Air Force developers, the upgrades also include adding new 8.33 radios to the aircraft to improve communication and initiatives to upgrade cockpit voice recorders and digital data recorders. C-130s will also receive new collision-avoidance technology designed to prevent the planes from hitting terrain or colliding with one another mid-air

    As a propeller-driven aircraft, the C-130s are able to fly at low altitudes, land in more rugged conditions and withstand harsh weather such as obscurants. The propellers make the aircraft’s engines less susceptible to debris flying in and causing operational problems for the engines.

    An Air Force C-17, by contrast, needs to operate in more defined conditions, such as areas with longer, separated or unobstructed runways. Flying debris or uneven terrain could of course present complications for C-17 engines, whereas the C-130 is specifically designed for low-altitude, high risk combat zones with uneven terrain – scenarios requiring both durability and maneuverability. In fact, in so-called “hot” or active combat zones, C-130s often airdrop weapons, supplies and even troops when called upon by Commanders.

    These factors inform a large part of the calculus for the ongoing Air Force effort to replace the C-130s existing hydromechanical propeller control system with a new Electronic Propeller Control System (EPCS).

    ​Electronic Propeller Control System modification is underway for all C‑130Hs, Grabowski said.

    “The T-56 3.5 engine, 8-bladed propeller, and EPCS are undergoing operational test and evaluation at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. These modifications were tested individually and are now undergoing test together to determine their combined operational effectiveness,” she added.

    An essay written by the National Guard Association of the United States further elaborates upon the merits of moving to electronic propeller control systems.

    “EPCS improves safety by accelerating response time when throttles are rapidly advanced; an issue in previous mishaps. The legacy propeller control system uses 1950’s technology and is a significant maintenance cost driver,” a 2015 National Guard Association “C-130 Propulsion Upgrade” paper for Congress states.

    Acceleration improvements such as this naturally bring tactical advantages as well; more maneuverable aircraft better able to handle and accelerate are less vulnerable to enemy ground missile attacks.

    “EPCS kits replace 54H60 propeller mechanical controls with a system based on digital computer software, offering improved reliability, and more precise performance. EPCS represents a 50-year leap in prop control technology for C-130 operators with the 54H60 propellers,” a statement from EPCS-maker Hamilton Sundstrand states.

    The original 1999 US Patent Application for Electronic Propeller Control Systems, submitted through United Technologies by a small group of inventors, explains that the new electrical system improves the mechanisms controlling the “pitch angle” of a propeller blade. This improves maneuverability, creates faster acceleration from the throttle and optimizes the connectivity between the propeller controls and the movements of the propeller blades. A stable pitch angle, described as the angle between the horizontal and vertical axes of the aircraft, is essential to aircraft performance and flight stability.

    “The apparatus converts mechanical inputs of the propeller and airframe systems to electronic signals, which can be measured by the electronic control. The apparatus also receives and converts the electronic control's commands into hydraulic pressure and flow changes through an electro-hydraulic servo valve,” the Patent Abstract writes.

    Massive overhaul to keep Air Force C-130 flying for 80 years into 2030s | Fox News
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