Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Create Account now to join.
  • Login:

Welcome to the NZ Hunting and Shooting Forums.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.

Alpine DPT


User Tag List

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 25
Like Tree14Likes

Thread: Blacksmithing

  1. #1
    Member EeeBees's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    past the gum trees on your left
    Posts
    5,024

    Blacksmithing

    In this video the guy speaks of the characteristics of iron...he says that the iron has a 'fibrous' character...what does that mean? How can iron be fibrous?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwTRIOtBNjo

    Making arrowheads...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Mk9pk-AQmI
    Last edited by EeeBees; 23-11-2014 at 11:08 AM.
    ...amitie, respect mutuel et amour...

    ...le beau et le bon, cela rime avec Breton!...

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    New Plymouth
    Posts
    92
    From doing material properties paper. Its hard to explain but i know how it works. http://thelibraryofmanufacturing.com...g/forging8.jpg
    that shows the difference in forging and machining.

    I learnt more on steel. that's just an alloy of carbon and iron. And if you bend the steel into shape you bend the grain and add stresses. If you hot work it it allows the grain to follow its natural path and not have stress. Annealing undoes the stresses. Or each time they fold the steel over they heat it up red hot again to undo all the stresses, fold it and repeat.
    Last edited by Flincher; 23-11-2014 at 01:09 PM.
    Munsey likes this.

  3. #3
    Member oneshot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Upper Hutt
    Posts
    839
    That's got me stuffed what he means by fibrous?? the arrow head video is good, I love iron work.
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    New Plymouth
    Posts
    92
    Here is the micro structures of each. I should of posted this first. I just couldn't remember the correct name to google it

    That is wrought iron

    that is steel.

    Notice how steel is more larger areas. wrought iron is more fibre/grains

  5. #5
    P38
    P38 is offline
    Member P38's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Hastings
    Posts
    5,717
    Been a life time since I sat in on a metrology class.

    Think of the fibrous structure of iron or steel more like the grain in wood, the grain always runs in one direction and will flow and bend in the direction you work the iron or steel.

    Cheers
    Pete

  6. #6
    SiB
    SiB is offline
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Invercargill
    Posts
    1,572
    If you're ever down Invercargill way give me a msg. I can put you in front of a forge and you can bash some steel (FMS, HC tool, poss some old wrought). Then you'll appreciate how it works differently.
    viper likes this.

  7. #7
    Member gadgetman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Christchurch
    Posts
    14,817
    And you see the difference in the way the iron and steel rust.
    There are only three types of people in this world. Those that can count, and those that can't!

  8. #8
    Member EeeBees's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    past the gum trees on your left
    Posts
    5,024
    Thank you very much, Guys, I appreciate your responses...those pictures are fantastic and I can now appreciate the difference!

    Watched a video about the Viking swords and how they were so superior...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FKvRHaJ2w6w
    Gibo likes this.
    ...amitie, respect mutuel et amour...

    ...le beau et le bon, cela rime avec Breton!...

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    BOP
    Posts
    16,712
    The Effiel Tower is constructed in Wrought Iron, if it had been constructed in Steel it would have rusted way quickly, it was meant to come down after the exhibition, but the designer knew that wouldnt happen once finished. Hence Wrought Iron and it's still there today!
    Boom, cough,cough,cough

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Middle Earth
    Posts
    2,349
    What you have to know about the Eiffel Tower is that it gets a new coat if paint nearly every 7 years.
    It takes about a year to do the whole tower. Over the years it took different colours.
    More details here:
    Home Page
    I lived for 3 years very close to it.
    Friwi.

  11. #11
    Member EeeBees's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    past the gum trees on your left
    Posts
    5,024
    Sixty tons of paint...!!!
    ...amitie, respect mutuel et amour...

    ...le beau et le bon, cela rime avec Breton!...

  12. #12
    Member Spook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Mt Motutapere/Northern Alps
    Posts
    2,063
    Quote Originally Posted by EeeBees View Post
    Sixty tons of paint...!!!
    Ten ton for the job and the rest went home as perks...oh sorry, not a kiwi job...might be different then.
    P38, ishoot10s, Dougie and 2 others like this.
    Which is worse, ignorance or apathy...I don't know and don't care.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    New Plymouth
    Posts
    92
    Some jobs get overweight if designers forget the weight of paint on structures and pipes. Mainly for offshore stuff as its more critical. cant be overweight and cant be underweight. they have crazy calcs for the balance and bending moments in the swell.

  14. #14
    Member Spook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Mt Motutapere/Northern Alps
    Posts
    2,063
    So, would the sixty ton of paint used on the tower be the weight of wet paint or would it be the dried weight of the paint?
    Which is worse, ignorance or apathy...I don't know and don't care.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    wellington
    Posts
    188
    I use a bit if proper old iron for knife fittings etc. it is totally different to forge than mild steel etc.you have to get it hotter, but it moves like clay when you get it there.if you get a bar of iron and snap it in a vise you can see the fibres in the break.
    EeeBees likes this.

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Hand forging/blacksmithing
    By Haggie in forum Off topic
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 22-01-2014, 08:56 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Welcome to NZ Hunting and Shooting Forums! We see you're new here, or arn't logged in. Create an account, and Login for full access including our FREE BUY and SELL section Register NOW!!