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Thread: This Day in History

  1. #1
    Semper excretia Ryan's Avatar
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    This Day in History

    6th August 1945

    On this day the Enola Gay, a US B-29 bomber drops the first atomic weapon ever used in combat on the Japanese city of Hiroshima. 70 000 people were killed as a direct consequence of the explosion but thousands more that escaped the blast, suffered the debilitating effects from radioactive fallout. These people are called Hibakusha or "explosion-affected people".

    The dawn of the age of nuclear weapons.

  2. #2
    OPCz Rushy's Avatar
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    And my that never happen again in my lifetime, my children's lifetime, my grandchildrens lifetime and my yet to be born great grandchildrens lifetime.
    P38, gadgetman, Scouser and 3 others like this.
    It takes 43 muscle's to frown and 17 to smile, but only 3 for proper trigger pull.
    What more do we need? If we are above ground and breathing the rest is up to us!
    Rule 1: Treat every firearm as loaded
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    Rule 7: Avoid alcohol and drugs when handling firearms

  3. #3
    Member gadgetman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rushy View Post
    And my that never happen again in my lifetime, my children's lifetime, my grandchildrens lifetime and my yet to be born great grandchildrens lifetime.
    Here here Rushy.
    There are only three types of people in this world. Those that can count, and those that can't!

  4. #4
    Caretaker jakewire's Avatar
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    I agree with Rushy.
    Timely reminder though , thanks Ryan
    veitnamcam likes this.
    Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?

  5. #5
    Member sako75's Avatar
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    I think it happened tomorrow

    Unfortunate way to end a war but the number of American lives saved by not having to invade Japan made it an obvious option
    Tommy, 300CALMAN and WallyR like this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sako75 View Post
    ...but the number of American lives saved by not having to invade Japan made it an obvious option
    Not just American lives... you can argue that had America invaded the mainland there would have been a huge loss of civilian life as their state of mind at that time wouldn't have allowed them to surrender. It would have been devastating for both sides.

  7. #7
    Semper excretia Ryan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sako75 View Post
    I think it happened tomorrow

    Unfortunate way to end a war but the number of American lives saved by not having to invade Japan made it an obvious option
    Hiroshima is best known as the first city in history to be targeted by a nuclear weapon when the United States Army Air Forces (USAAF) dropped an atomic bomb on the city at 8:15 a.m. on August 6, 1945, near the end of World War II.[1]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hiroshima

  8. #8
    Semper excretia Ryan's Avatar
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    8th August 1963: Great Train Robbery

    On this day in 1963, the 15 thieves involved in the Great Train Robbery, one of the most famous heists of all time, escape in an ex-British Army truck and two stolen Land Rover four-wheel drive all-terrain vehicles, making off with some $7 million in stolen loot.

    The mastermind of the Great Train Robbery was Bruce Reynolds, a known burglar and armed robber. Inspired by the railroad heists of the Wild West in America, Reynolds and 14 other men wearing ski masks and helmets held up the Royal Mail train heading between Glasgow, Scotland, and London, England. They used a false red signal to get the train to stop, then hit the driver with an iron bar, seriously injuring him, in order to gain control of the train. The thieves loaded 120 mailbags filled with the equivalent of $7 million in used bank notes into their Land Rovers and sped off. The vehicles had been stolen in central London and marked with identical license plates in order to confuse the police.

    In their hideout at Leatherslade Farm in Buckinghamshire, England, the robbers divided their loot. Viewed as folk heroes by the public for the audacious scale of their crime and their flight from justice, 12 of the 15 robbers nevertheless were eventually captured. In all, the gang of thieves received a total sentence of some 300 years. One of them, a small-time hood named Ronnie Biggs, escaped from prison after just 15 months and underwent plastic surgery to change his appearance. He fled the country and eluded capture for years, finally giving himself up in 2001 when he returned from Brazil voluntarily to serve the 28 years remaining in his sentence.

    The two Land Rovers used in the robbery were discovered at the thieves’ hideout; a car enthusiast still owns one of them today. Produced by the British-based Rover Company, the Land Rover made its debut at the Amsterdam Motor Show in 1948. It was modeled after the four-wheel drive American-made Jeeps used by the British War Department during World War II and was made of cheaper, readily available aluminum alloy due to the postwar shortage of steel. By 1960, Land Rover production had reached 500,000 vehicles per year, and the all-terrain vehicle had become popular in all types of climates–desert, jungle and city–around the world. Rover later introduced an upscale version called the Range Rover, which become another bestseller for the company. The German automaker BMW purchased Rover in 1994, but split the brand six years later, selling the Land Rover name to Ford Motor Company. In 2008, Ford sold Land Rover, along with Jaguar, to Tata Motors Ltd., India’s top automaker.
    EeeBees and JoshC like this.

  9. #9
    Semper excretia Ryan's Avatar
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    9th August 1945

    On this day in 71 years ago, a second atom bomb is dropped on Japan by the United States, at Nagasaki, resulting finally in Japan’s unconditional surrender.

    The devastation wrought at Hiroshima was not sufficient to convince the Japanese War Council to accept the Potsdam Conference’s demand for unconditional surrender. The United States had already planned to drop their second atom bomb, nicknamed “Fat Man,” on August 11 in the event of such recalcitrance, but bad weather expected for that day pushed the date up to August 9th. So at 1:56 a.m., a specially adapted B-29 bomber, called “Bock’s Car,” after its usual commander, Frederick Bock, took off from Tinian Island under the command of Maj. Charles W. Sweeney. Nagasaki was a shipbuilding center, the very industry intended for destruction. The bomb was dropped at 11:02 a.m., 1,650 feet above the city. The explosion unleashed the equivalent force of 22,000 tons of TNT. The hills that surrounded the city did a better job of containing the destructive force, but the number killed is estimated at anywhere between 60,000 and 80,000 (exact figures are impossible, the blast having obliterated bodies and disintegrated records).

    General Leslie R. Groves, the man responsible for organising the Manhattan Project, which solved the problem of producing and delivering the nuclear explosion, estimated that another atom bomb would be ready to use against Japan by August 17 or 18—but it was not necessary. Even though the War Council still remained divided (“It is far too early to say that the war is lost,” opined the Minister of War), Emperor Hirohito, by request of two War Council members eager to end the war, met with the Council and declared that “continuing the war can only result in the annihilation of the Japanese people…” The Emperor of Japan gave his permission for unconditional surrender.

  10. #10
    Member Tommy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan View Post
    Emperor Hirohito, by request of two War Council members eager to end the war, met with the Council and declared that “continuing the war can only result in the annihilation of the Japanese people…” The Emperor of Japan gave his permission for unconditional surrender.
    Did not know that bit. That would have been an incredibly hard decision to make (for him) and still he did it.

  11. #11
    MIA somewhere in Nam 300CALMAN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy View Post
    Did not know that bit. That would have been an incredibly hard decision to make (for him) and still he did it.
    Most westerners (including myself) can never full appreciate that. He was not just an Emperor but a god figure to the Japanese. It was basically like one of your gods admitting that well actually I am human. It changed Japan and the Japanese forever.

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    I visited Hiroshima earlier this year, was there for 2 days, the first day was spent walking around the peace park and visiting the A bomb museum, it was bloody amazing and a very sobbering experience. The bomb was dropped and ended off target by a few hundred meters, it detonated several hundred meters above ground and everthing within an 8km radius was toast. Most of the buildings in those days were built from timber and were just incinerated.

    If i had more time i would have gone to see the Japanese Battleship just outside Hiroshima, its a similar set up to the Missouri in Pearl Harbour.

  13. #13
    Semper excretia Ryan's Avatar
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    10th August 1776 - London learns of American independence

    Until the Declaration of Independence formally transformed the 13 British colonies into states, both Americans and the British saw the conflict centered in Massachusetts as a local uprising within the British empire. To King George III, it was a colonial rebellion, and to the Americans, it was a struggle for their rights as British citizens. However, when Parliament continued to oppose any reform and remained unwilling to negotiate with the American rebels and instead hired Hessians, German mercenaries, to help the British army crush the rebellion, the Continental Congress began to pass measures abolishing British authority in the colonies.

    In January 1776, Thomas Paine published Common Sense, an influential political pamphlet that convincingly argued for American independence from the British monarchy. It sold more than 500,000 copies in just a few months. By the spring of 1776, support for independence had swept through the colonies, the Continental Congress called for states to form their own governments and a five-man committee was assigned to draft a document declaring independence from the British king.

    The Declaration of Independence was largely the work of Virginian Thomas Jefferson. In justifying American independence, Jefferson drew generously from the political philosophy of John Locke, an advocate of natural rights, and from the work of other British theorists. The declaration features the immortal lines “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” It then goes on to present a long list of grievances that provided the American rationale for rebellion.
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  14. #14
    Semper excretia Ryan's Avatar
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    11th August 1934 - Federal prisoners land on Alcatraz

    A group of federal prisoners classified as “most dangerous” arrives at Alcatraz Island, a 22-acre rocky outcrop situated 1.5 miles offshore in San Francisco Bay. The convicts–the first civilian prisoners to be housed in the new high-security penitentiary–joined a few dozen military prisoners left over from the island’s days as a U.S. military prison.

    Alcatraz was an uninhabited seabird haven when it was explored by Spanish Lieutenant Juan Manuel de Ayala in 1775. He named it Isla de los Alcatraces, or “Island of the Pelicans.” Fortified by the Spanish, Alcatraz was sold to the United States in 1849. In 1854, it had the distinction of housing the first lighthouse on the coast of California. Beginning in 1859, a U.S. Army detachment was garrisoned there, and from 1868 Alcatraz was used to house military criminals. In addition to recalcitrant U.S. soldiers, prisoners included rebellious Indian scouts, American soldiers fighting in the Philippines who had deserted to the Filipino cause, and Chinese civilians who resisted the U.S. Army during the Boxer Rebellion. In 1907, Alcatraz was designated the Pacific Branch of the United States Military Prison.

    In 1934, Alcatraz was fortified into a high-security federal penitentiary designed to hold the most dangerous prisoners in the U.S. penal system, especially those with a penchant for escape attempts. The first shipment of civilian prisoners arrived on August 11, 1934. Later that month, more shiploads arrived, featuring, among other convicts, infamous mobster Al Capone. In September, George “Machine Gun” Kelly, another luminary of organized crime, landed on Alcatraz.

    In the 1940s, a famous Alcatraz prisoner was Richard Stroud, the “Birdman of Alcatraz.” A convicted murderer, Stroud wrote an important study on birds while being held in solitary confinement in Leavenworth Prison in Kansas. Regarded as extremely dangerous because of his 1916 murder of a guard at Leavenworth, he was transferred to Alcatraz in 1942. Stroud was not allowed to continue his avian research at Alcatraz.

    Although some three dozen attempted, no prisoner was known to have successfully escaped “The Rock.” However, the bodies of several escapees believed drowned in the treacherous waters of San Francisco Bay were never found. The story of the 1962 escape of three of these men, Frank Morris and brothers John and Clarence Anglin, inspired the 1979 film Escape from Alcatraz. Another prisoner, John Giles, caught a boat ride to the shore in 1945 dressed in an army uniform he had stolen piece by piece, but he was questioned by a suspicious officer after disembarking and sent back to Alcatraz. Only one man, John Paul Scott, was recorded to have reached the mainland by swimming, but he came ashore exhausted and hypothermic at the foot of the Golden Gate Bridge. Police found him lying unconscious and in a state of shock.

    In 1963, U.S. Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy ordered Alcatraz closed, citing the high expense of its maintenance. In its 29-year run, Alcatraz housed more than 1,500 convicts. In March 1964 a group of Sioux Indians briefly occupied the island, citing an 1868 treaty with the Sioux allowing Indians to claim any “unoccupied government land.” In November 1969, a group of nearly 100 Indian students and activists began a more prolonged occupation of the island, remaining there until they were forced off by federal marshals in June 1971.

    In 1972, Alcatraz was opened to the public as part of the newly created Golden Gate National Recreation Area, which is maintained by the National Park Service. More than one million tourists visit Alcatraz Island and the former prison annually.

  15. #15
    Member Maca49's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sako75 View Post
    I think it happened tomorrow

    Unfortunate way to end a war but the number of American lives saved by not having to invade Japan made it an obvious option
    How do you know it happened tomorrow?
    Boom, cough,cough,cough

 

 

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