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Thread: This Day in History

  1. #16
    Member Maca49's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by planenutz View Post
    Not just American lives... you can argue that had America invaded the mainland there would have been a huge loss of civilian life as their state of mind at that time wouldn't have allowed them to surrender. It would have been devastating for both sides.
    Geeze they had to drop a second one to wake him up! What a cruel world huh? Remember they were only babies compared with today weapons.
    Boom, cough,cough,cough

  2. #17
    Member Maca49's Avatar
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    We have lived in a very privileged era
    Savage1 likes this.
    Boom, cough,cough,cough

  3. #18
    OPCz Rushy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maca49 View Post
    We have lived in a very privileged era
    I would have preferred being a Viking in the tenth century. All that rape pillage and plunder in England would have been a hoot Maca.
    It takes 43 muscle's to frown and 17 to smile, but only 3 for proper trigger pull.
    What more do we need? If we are above ground and breathing the rest is up to us!
    Rule 1: Treat every firearm as loaded
    Rule 2: Always point firearms in a safe direction
    Rule 3: Load a firearm only when ready to fire
    Rule 4: Identify your target beyond all doubt
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    Rule 7: Avoid alcohol and drugs when handling firearms

  4. #19
    Member Maca49's Avatar
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    Live by the sword! Die by the sword? Way to go @Rushy personally having a blade poked into me is something that makes me shiver! I may have been there in a previous life
    gadgetman likes this.
    Boom, cough,cough,cough

  5. #20
    OPCz Rushy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maca49 View Post
    Live by the sword! Die by the sword? Way to go @Rushy personally having a blade poked into me is something that makes me shiver! I may have been there in a previous life
    Been there, done that with the blade poked in me Maca but I would have been more of an axe weilder than a sword swinger.
    It takes 43 muscle's to frown and 17 to smile, but only 3 for proper trigger pull.
    What more do we need? If we are above ground and breathing the rest is up to us!
    Rule 1: Treat every firearm as loaded
    Rule 2: Always point firearms in a safe direction
    Rule 3: Load a firearm only when ready to fire
    Rule 4: Identify your target beyond all doubt
    Rule 5: Check your firing zone
    Rule 6: Store firearms and ammunition safely
    Rule 7: Avoid alcohol and drugs when handling firearms

  6. #21
    Semper excretia Ryan's Avatar
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    12th August 1961 - East Germany begins construction of the Berlin Wall

    In an effort to stem the tide of refugees attempting to leave East Berlin, the communist government of East Germany begins building the Berlin Wall to divide East and West Berlin. Construction of the wall caused a short-term crisis in U.S.-Soviet bloc relations, and the wall itself came to symbolize the Cold War.

    Throughout the 1950s and into the early 1960s, thousands of people from East Berlin crossed over into West Berlin to reunite with families and escape communist repression. In an effort to stop that outflow, the government of East Germany, on the night of August 12, 1961, began to seal off all points of entrance into West Berlin from East Berlin by stringing barbed wire and posting sentries. In the days and weeks to come, construction of a concrete block wall began, complete with sentry towers and minefields around it. The Berlin Wall succeeded in completely sealing off the two sections of Berlin. The U.S. government responded angrily. Commanders of U.S. troops in West Berlin even began to make plans to bulldoze the wall, but gave up on the idea when the Soviets moved armored units into position to protect it. The West German government was furious with America’s lack of action, but President John F. Kennedy believed that “A wall is a hell of a lot better than a war.” In an attempt to reassure the West Germans that the United States was not abandoning them, Kennedy traveled to the Berlin Wall in June 1963, and famously declared, “Ich bin ein Berliner!” (“I am a Berliner!”). Since the word “Berliner” was commonly referred to as a jelly doughnut throughout most of Germany, Kennedy’s improper use of German grammar was also translated as “I am a jelly doughnut.” However, due to the context of his speech, Kennedy’s intended meaning that he stood together with West Berlin in its rivalry with communist East Berlin and the German Democratic Republic was understood by the German people.

    In the years to come, the Berlin Wall became a physical symbol of the Cold War. The stark division between communist East Berlin and democratic West Berlin served as the subject for numerous editorials and speeches in the United States, while the Soviet bloc characterized the wall as a necessary protection against the degrading and immoral influences of decadent Western culture and capitalism. During the lifetime of the wall, nearly 80 people were killed trying to escape from East to West Berlin. In late 1989, with communist governments falling throughout Eastern Europe, the Berlin Wall was finally opened and then demolished. For many observers, this action was the signal that the Cold War was finally coming to an end.



    East Berlin Death Strip as seen from Axel Springer Building, 1984
    Last edited by Ryan; 12-08-2016 at 11:31 AM.
    Savage1 likes this.

  7. #22
    OPCz Rushy's Avatar
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    It is quite sobering stuff when you see the few remaining remnants of the wall and other landmarks of the Cold War era like the Brandenburg Gate etc. I worked for a German business several years ago and knew colleagues who were from both sides of the wall. On the whole the former East German folk indicated that they were far happier after the wall came down.
    It takes 43 muscle's to frown and 17 to smile, but only 3 for proper trigger pull.
    What more do we need? If we are above ground and breathing the rest is up to us!
    Rule 1: Treat every firearm as loaded
    Rule 2: Always point firearms in a safe direction
    Rule 3: Load a firearm only when ready to fire
    Rule 4: Identify your target beyond all doubt
    Rule 5: Check your firing zone
    Rule 6: Store firearms and ammunition safely
    Rule 7: Avoid alcohol and drugs when handling firearms

  8. #23
    Semper excretia Ryan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rushy View Post
    It is quite sobering stuff when you see the few remaining remnants of the wall and other landmarks of the Cold War era like the Brandenburg Gate etc. I worked for a German business several years ago and knew colleagues who were from both sides of the wall. On the whole the former East German folk indicated that they were far happier after the wall came down.
    Indeed. The East suffered a prolonged economic downturn after the fall of the wall. The best brains went to the West and those that stayed had few job opportunities because the industry that did exist (primarily to supply the Soviet Union) did not produce anything that anyone in Europe wanted (who wants a Trabant? lol).

    Took a while but things are looking better for that side of Germany. My recent travels didn't take me to Berlin (apart from transit) but I'd like to have a nosey around Vogelsang.

  9. #24
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    I was in Germany at the start of last year and went on a tour through and old Stasi prison in Berlin and it's quite freaky seeing the extent that they went to while keeping everyone in check

  10. #25
    Semper excretia Ryan's Avatar
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    13 August 1902 - Rotary engine inventor Felix Wankel born

    The German engineer Felix Wankel, inventor of a rotary engine that will be used in race cars, is born on August 13, 1902, in Lahr, Germany.

    Wankel reportedly came up with the basic idea for a new type of internal combustion gasoline engine when he was only 17 years old. In 1924, Wankel set up a small laboratory where he began the research and development of his dream engine, which would be able to attain intake, compression, combustion and exhaust, all while rotating. He brought his knowledge of rotary valves to his work with the German Aeronautical Research Establishment during World War II, and to a leading German motorcycle company, NSU Motorenwerk AG, beginning in 1951. Wankel completed his first design of a rotary-piston engine in 1954, and the first unit was tested in 1957.

    In other internal-combustion engines, moving pistons did the work of getting the combustion process started; in the Wankel rotary engine, an orbiting rotor in the shape of a curved equilateral triangle served this purpose. Fewer moving parts created a smoothly performing engine that was lightweight, compact, low-cost and required fewer repairs. After NSU officially announced the completion of the Wankel rotary engine in late 1959, some 100 companies around the world rushed to propose partnerships that would get the engine inside their products. Mazda, the Japanese automaker, signed a formal contract with NSU in July 1961, after receiving approval from the Japanese government.

    In an attempt to experiment with the rotary engine and perfect it for use in its vehicles, Mazda formed an RE (Rotary Engine) Research Department in 1963. The Cosmo Sport, which Mazda released in May 1967, was the planetís first dual-rotor rotary engine car. With futuristic styling and superior performance, the Cosmo wowed car enthusiasts worldwide. Mazda began installing rotary engines in its sedans and coupes in 1968, and the vehicles hit the U.S. market in 1971. In the wake of a global oil crisis in 1973-74, Mazda continually worked on improving its rotary engines to improve fuel efficiency, and by the end of that decade its sports cars had become popular in both Europe and the United States In addition to Mazda, a number of other companies licensed the Wankel engine during the 1960s and 1970s, including Daimler-Benz, Alfa Romeo, Rolls Royce, Porsche, General Motors, Suzuki and Toyota.

    Meanwhile, Wankel continued his own work with the rotary piston engine, forming his own research establishment in Lindau, Germany, in the mid-1970s. In 1986, he sold the institute for 100 million Deutschmarks (around $41 million) to Daimler Benz, maker of the Mercedes. Wankel filed a new patent as late as 1987; the following year, he died after a long illness.

  11. #26
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    He was a concentric old crank

    Pointer, gadgetman, Maca49 and 3 others like this.
    A big fast bullet beats a little fast bullet every time

  12. #27
    OPCz Rushy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 7mmsaum View Post
    He was a concentric old crank

    Very clever
    It takes 43 muscle's to frown and 17 to smile, but only 3 for proper trigger pull.
    What more do we need? If we are above ground and breathing the rest is up to us!
    Rule 1: Treat every firearm as loaded
    Rule 2: Always point firearms in a safe direction
    Rule 3: Load a firearm only when ready to fire
    Rule 4: Identify your target beyond all doubt
    Rule 5: Check your firing zone
    Rule 6: Store firearms and ammunition safely
    Rule 7: Avoid alcohol and drugs when handling firearms

  13. #28
    Member gadgetman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maca49 View Post
    Live by the sword! Die by the sword? Way to go @Rushy personally having a blade poked into me is something that makes me shiver! I may have been there in a previous life
    They don't like the cold steel up 'em sir.
    Maca49 likes this.
    There are only three types of people in this world. Those that can count, and those that can't!

  14. #29
    Member EeeBees's Avatar
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    Found this under Wikipedia...

    The first working prototype, DKM 54, produced 21 horsepower and ran on February 1, 1957, at the NSU research and development department Versuchsabteilung TX. The KKM 57 (the Wankel rotary engine, Kreiskolbenmotor) was constructed by NSU engineer Hanns Dieter Paschke in 1957 without the knowledge of Felix Wankel, who later remarked "you have turned my race horse into a plow mare".
    veitnamcam and gadgetman like this.
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  15. #30
    Member Maca49's Avatar
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    And the Wankel caused the carless days with their great thirst for petrol I have some perserved relics floating around my workshop, mate sold his Ford V8 to by an RX 2 in the early 80s, remember winding it up out the Opaki Straight north of Masterton, watching the revs climb was a bit different. He traded size and comfort for a two door coupe and they both had the same petrol usage!
    Boom, cough,cough,cough

 

 

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