Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Create Account now to join.
  • Login:

Welcome to the NZ Hunting and Shooting Forums.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.

Black Watch DPT


User Tag List

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 16
Like Tree9Likes

Thread: four legged lawn mowers

  1. #1
    Fulla
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Cni
    Posts
    1,412

    four legged lawn mowers

    so im moving onto 1 ha soon.
    im thinking about taking on some for legged lawn mowers. if I can eat the odd one that's cool. but I don't want anything too high maintenance. the place at this stage only has one small pen for stock handling. I was thinking sheep, im not sure of numbers. more so the wool shedding kind. (not deer fenced, so no deer) I don't need to make money off them, or eat a lot. what I do eat will obviously mean one less lawn mower. the sheep I could butcher myself though.
    how old do sheep live for?

    any ideas or experiences?

  2. #2
    unit moonhunt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    warkworth
    Posts
    1,463
    If you want to eat them don't let them get old , spot on at around a year old
    Wiltshires are more hardy than dorpers in my opinion, all the dorpers around these parts have shocking feet , but they seem to be life stylers sheep and the prices are stupid
    Rule 4: Identify your target beyond all doubt
    OPCz

  3. #3
    Fulla
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Cni
    Posts
    1,412
    thanks, that's good to know.
    they do ask a lot for them don't they.

  4. #4
    Member mattdw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    South Canterbury
    Posts
    102
    If they're not getting any older than a year you might get away with not shearing them at all. I have 5 romney and dorset on my patch (1.7ha) and they're fine up until they need shearing or tupping; they're not used to being moved so they just stand and look at the dog, or escape up the neighbour's driveway instead of staying on the road. Pain in the ass. (Mine are too old to eat so I'm breeding them for now, no idea what my long-term plan is.)

    Probably easiest is to just get runt or orphan lambs off a nearby farmer every year, knock them over whenever they're big enough to eat or really need shearing, whichever comes first.
    bully likes this.

  5. #5
    unit moonhunt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    warkworth
    Posts
    1,463
    Quote Originally Posted by bully View Post
    thanks, that's good to know.
    they do ask a lot for them don't they.
    I suppose your down country , I can do Wiltshire lambs at meat prices
    Rule 4: Identify your target beyond all doubt
    OPCz

  6. #6
    unit moonhunt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    warkworth
    Posts
    1,463
    I would go with matts advice , go to sale yards and pick up some store lambs for the right price
    bully likes this.
    Rule 4: Identify your target beyond all doubt
    OPCz

  7. #7
    Fulla
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Cni
    Posts
    1,412
    would be handy moonhunt but im about four hours away from you.
    thanks anyway.

    I did wonder about the fact that if they taste good at 12 months and need sharing once a year if that plan would work out. thanks.

  8. #8
    Sako & Anshultz!! Sako 243's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Palmerston North
    Posts
    530
    You're not set up for cattle effectively by the sounds of it, so sheep are definitely the way to go. Goats are challenging to keep them well contained.

    If you want low cost options, buy in a good ram and a couple of ewes and just run them together all the time and let them breed when and how they like. After the initial purchase, they keep going and producing lambs for the freezer. That will naturally increase your flock during the spring and early summer when you have more grass then take the lambs out as needed for the freezer and control grass that way.

    If you can't be stuffed with breeding etc, or have young children and the ram is a problem, then do as above, by some store lambs each year and as they fatten slowly add them to the freezer reducing numbers low during winter and start again in the spring.

    You ask how many sheep, is it 1ha total inc house lot or 1ha of grazable paddocks?

    I think from memory it's a stock unit per acre and a ewe in lamb is just over a SU. so a couple of ewes and a ram might be close

    John
    bully likes this.

  9. #9
    Member Dundee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Way East of D'Vagas
    Posts
    16,241
    Hoggets are far better eating than lamb in my opinion a bigger better animal.
    bully likes this.
    "Thats not a knife, this is a knife"
    Rule 2: Always point firearms in a safe direction
    CFD

    tps://www.timeanddate.com/countdown/generic?iso=20180505T00&p0=264&msg=Dundees+Countdo wn+to+Gamebird+Season+2018&font=cursive

  10. #10
    OPCz Rushy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Nor West of Auckland on the true right of the Kaipara River
    Posts
    27,867
    Yep Dundee I agree. Bully get yourself a South Suffolk ram and three or four ewes and you will get lambs about this time every year. Across time you can choose whether you want to eat lamb, hogget or mutton. Each has its own advantages. I enjoy lamb but I would walk across broken glass on the stubs of my elbows for mutton.
    bully likes this.
    It takes 43 muscle's to frown and 17 to smile, but only 3 for proper trigger pull.
    What more do we need? If we are above ground and breathing the rest is up to us!
    Rule 1: Treat every firearm as loaded
    Rule 2: Always point firearms in a safe direction
    Rule 3: Load a firearm only when ready to fire
    Rule 4: Identify your target beyond all doubt
    Rule 5: Check your firing zone
    Rule 6: Store firearms and ammunition safely
    Rule 7: Avoid alcohol and drugs when handling firearms

  11. #11
    Almost literate. veitnamcam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Nelson
    Posts
    20,057
    Mutton! lamb is tasteless.

    Sent from my GT-S5360T using Tapatalk 2
    bully likes this.
    "Hunting and fishing" fucking over licenced firearms owners since ages ago.

  12. #12
    OPCz Rushy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Nor West of Auckland on the true right of the Kaipara River
    Posts
    27,867
    Quote Originally Posted by veitnamcam View Post
    Mutton! lamb is tasteless.

    Sent from my GT-S5360T using Tapatalk 2
    VC the day you and I sit down to a feed together I just know there is going to be a shit fight over the bones. Ha ha ha ha
    bully likes this.
    It takes 43 muscle's to frown and 17 to smile, but only 3 for proper trigger pull.
    What more do we need? If we are above ground and breathing the rest is up to us!
    Rule 1: Treat every firearm as loaded
    Rule 2: Always point firearms in a safe direction
    Rule 3: Load a firearm only when ready to fire
    Rule 4: Identify your target beyond all doubt
    Rule 5: Check your firing zone
    Rule 6: Store firearms and ammunition safely
    Rule 7: Avoid alcohol and drugs when handling firearms

  13. #13
    Fulla
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Cni
    Posts
    1,412
    I was wondering what you done Dundee. the boys seemed to of snapped them up pretty quick.
    the sheep will have to forgive me for missing there birthday, I get lamb, probably up to a year old. but I don't get hogget or mutton?
    from my drinking in pubs days, I understand mutton dressed as lamb though.

    thanks for the ideas.

  14. #14
    Fulla
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Cni
    Posts
    1,412
    oh... its 1 ha minus the house.

  15. #15
    Member Dundee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Way East of D'Vagas
    Posts
    16,241
    lamb is up to 1 year old, then hogget (two tooth) up to two years old and mutton is meat of a sheep.

    But what would I know I'm a dairy farmer. Are these the correct names @BRADS ?
    bully likes this.
    "Thats not a knife, this is a knife"
    Rule 2: Always point firearms in a safe direction
    CFD

    tps://www.timeanddate.com/countdown/generic?iso=20180505T00&p0=264&msg=Dundees+Countdo wn+to+Gamebird+Season+2018&font=cursive

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. 3 legged GSP locked up for theft
    By RCGSP in forum Hunting Dogs
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 16-01-2013, 10:47 PM
  2. 3 legged GSP locked up for theft
    By RCGSP in forum Dogs
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 16-01-2013, 10:47 PM
  3. Ammonium Nitrate - for the LAWN
    By Spanners in forum Off topic
    Replies: 46
    Last Post: 18-08-2012, 06:38 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Welcome to NZ Hunting and Shooting Forums! We see you're new here, or arn't logged in. Create an account, and Login for full access including our FREE BUY and SELL section Register NOW!!