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Thread: The Gallipoli Spirit - a Turkish Voice

  1. #1
    Member Cordite's Avatar
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    The Gallipoli Spirit - a Turkish Voice

    I Thought I'd go online and see what Turkish MSM is saying.

    From: Christchurch massacre and the spirit of Gallipoli

    March 22 2019

    By BORA BAYRAKTAR

    Christchurch massacre and the spirit of Gallipoli


    The Gallipoli war also holds a special place in the hearts of the Turkish people who fought to defend the homeland. In the last days of the Ottoman Empire young Turks were able to stop the superpowers of the time, British and French armies, with their determination.

    The Turkish nation rehearsed its national war of liberation in Gallipoli and found its leader, who would take the nation out of darkness to freedom in the following years.

    Australians and New Zealanders also became nations earning their national identities in the war. Each year, thousands of Australians and New Zealanders attend the Dawn Ceremony on April 25, to commemorate their loss at the Anzac Cove in Gallipoli.

    As a graduate of Gallipoli High School, I attended the 75th anniversary of the start of the land war in 1990. I still remember the feeling. British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, Turkish President Turgut Özal and many leaders joined that great ceremony. But the most powerful image which stayed in my mind was the hug between Turkish and Australian veterans on the sideline of the official ceremonies. They were over their 90s. They tried to communicate about their war memories, as soldiers who fired at each other 75 years ago. They seemed like two brothers who reunited after decades. Probably this was the last time veterans met in such a big ceremony. I saw and felt the Gallipoli spirit there and have never forgotten about it.

    All Gallipoli veterans have probably passed away, but their friendship spirit, despite the fierce battle, is still there.

    The words of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk in 1934, who was a commander in the Ottoman army during the Gallipoli War, inscribed on a stone block recently renewed and erected in the National Park at an area that was once a battlefield, has recently resurfaced again. “Those heroes that shed their blood and lost their lives ... You are now lying in the soil of a friendly country. Therefore rest in peace. There is no difference between the Johnnies and the Mehmets to us where they lie side by side here in this country of ours ... You, the mothers who sent their sons from faraway countries, wipe away your tears; your sons are now lying in our bosom and are in peace. After having lost their lives on this land they have become our sons as well,” his words read. Atatürk had showed extraordinary maturity and extended the hand of friendship to his former enemies. His words were welcomed by his counterparts.

    After that, citizens of the province of Çanakkale, where Gallipoli is located, and consecutive governments in Turkey embraced these words, and commemorations took place in an atmosphere of friendship. This is the Gallipoli spirit. The massacre committed by a cold-blooded, racist murderer in New Zealand cannot and should not overshadow this spirit.

    The terrorist last week killed 50 people in two mosques. He showed no sign of regret after getting caught. The dates and messages on his gun and the manifesto he published were statements of shame and hostility against Muslims, specifically targeting Turks and Turkey. The horribleness of the killing spree aroused indignation in Turkey. But this is now under control.

    The attitude of New Zealand’s Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern helped to contain it, the ceremonies remembering the victims of the racist, terrorist attack behooved the spirit of Gallipoli.

    Although the words of President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, who was clearly targeted by the terrorist, at a Gallipoli ceremony were a reaction to the killer, it caused a problem between Turkey and New Zealand. The presidency’s head of communications, Fahrettin Altun, clarified Erdoğan’s words in line with Gallipoli spirit. “The president was responding to the so-called ‘manifesto’ of the terrorist who killed 50 innocent Muslims in Christchurch, New Zealand. Turks have always been the most welcoming and gracious hosts to their #Anzac visitors,” he said.

    The terrorist in Christchurch wanted to kill not only the Muslims of the town, but also the spirit of Gallipoli.

    I think the best answer to the rising racist and radical terrorism in the world would be strengthening and keeping the Gallipoli spirit alive.

    Gallipoli, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, Turkey, Çanakkale
    Bad choices do kill.

  2. #2
    OPCz Rushy's Avatar
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    Calm pragmatic maturity. There is much to be learned there.
    gsp follower, A330driver and 40mm like this.
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    I still think erdogans a rank opportunist and slippery as

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    Member Ben Waimata's Avatar
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    I've always felt very uncomfortable about the Gallipoli thing, the war made sense at the time but social values have changed and we've moved on. In reality Gallipoli was an invasion by a foreign military force, and our natural instincts should be supporting the people defending their homes and families. The fact that one of my ancestors left his blood on that beach doesn't mean he was on the side of right.

    There's a small monument outside my house, carved into stone by the soldiers stationed on the hill here during WW2. The expectation for some reason was that the Japanese Army was going to land at our beach. If it had happened, it would have been a horrible bloodbath... just like Gallipoli was 26 years earlier. If it had happened, and thousands of Japanese young people made the pilgrimage here every year to mourn their war heros, I really don't think they would be well received. I think Turkey shows much more maturity than we would, if the situation was reversed.
    Brian and Daithi like this.

  5. #5
    Member Cordite's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Waimata View Post
    I've always felt very uncomfortable about the Gallipoli thing, the war made sense at the time but social values have changed and we've moved on. In reality Gallipoli was an invasion by a foreign military force, and our natural instincts should be supporting the people defending their homes and families. The fact that one of my ancestors left his blood on that beach doesn't mean he was on the side of right.

    There's a small monument outside my house, carved into stone by the soldiers stationed on the hill here during WW2. The expectation for some reason was that the Japanese Army was going to land at our beach. If it had happened, it would have been a horrible bloodbath... just like Gallipoli was 26 years earlier. If it had happened, and thousands of Japanese young people made the pilgrimage here every year to mourn their war heros, I really don't think they would be well received. I think Turkey shows much more maturity than we would, if the situation was reversed.
    Turkey can afford to be gracious to Kiwis visiting to reminisce about their hapless ancestors ... because Turkey WON that battle.
    Bad choices do kill.

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    One of my Graddads was a Veteran of Egypt and France. He was severly wounded be shrapnel and bullits on Gallipoli and after France suffered severe shellshock. He was in the Waikato Mounted Rifles. He was a farmer. Those chaps were never given reason to fight other than to support King and Country. They did so honourably in the beliefs and faith in their leaders.
    Whwn Grandad eventually died in his eighties he stilk had several Turkish bullets lodged where the surgeons could not remove them. He akways spoke respectfully of the Turkish soldiers and had sadness for ad much as he did for our chaps and Aussies. As I grew up I came to understand why he never trusted "the system again". He kept most of his spare money buried in his garden right up to his passing ; and yetxwhen WWII broke out his sons had to dissuade him from volunteering yet again. He saidcthe Turks were brave men.

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    Member scotty's Avatar
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    i had a quick look at what was in the serbian media re the chch shootings.....wont bother repeating the comments it basicly broke down into shit fight between serbs and albanians......still alotta hate over there . only looked as it was one of the countries the ass hat visited

  8. #8
    Member Micky Duck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Waimata View Post
    I've always felt very uncomfortable about the Gallipoli thing, the war made sense at the time but social values have changed and we've moved on. In reality Gallipoli was an invasion by a foreign military force, and our natural instincts should be supporting the people defending their homes and families. The fact that one of my ancestors left his blood on that beach doesn't mean he was on the side of right.

    There's a small monument outside my house, carved into stone by the soldiers stationed on the hill here during WW2. The expectation for some reason was that the Japanese Army was going to land at our beach. If it had happened, it would have been a horrible bloodbath... just like Gallipoli was 26 years earlier. If it had happened, and thousands of Japanese young people made the pilgrimage here every year to mourn their war heros, I really don't think they would be well received. I think Turkey shows much more maturity than we would, if the situation was reversed.
    ummmm we do have thousands of Japanese who visit here every year and if you do a bit of research into the goings on in WW2 particularly in reguards to P.O.W.s treatment at the hands of the Japanese you will possibly realise we have a huge capacity for forgiveness....given enough time.
    40mm likes this.

  9. #9
    Member gadgetman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Waimata View Post
    I've always felt very uncomfortable about the Gallipoli thing, the war made sense at the time but social values have changed and we've moved on. In reality Gallipoli was an invasion by a foreign military force, and our natural instincts should be supporting the people defending their homes and families. The fact that one of my ancestors left his blood on that beach doesn't mean he was on the side of right.

    There's a small monument outside my house, carved into stone by the soldiers stationed on the hill here during WW2. The expectation for some reason was that the Japanese Army was going to land at our beach. If it had happened, it would have been a horrible bloodbath... just like Gallipoli was 26 years earlier. If it had happened, and thousands of Japanese young people made the pilgrimage here every year to mourn their war heros, I really don't think they would be well received. I think Turkey shows much more maturity than we would, if the situation was reversed.
    I know what you mean about the uncomfortable bit. But I too looked at old soldiers from different sides after WWII. They both knew what it was to go through the ordeals they did and respected each other for it. Gallipoli was the real birth of our nation. It was the spark that initiated change in the way we Antipodeans conducted ourselves, taking charge of our own from then on. Those lost in WWI was an incredible toll when you consider the number that didn't come back compared to the size of our nation.
    There are only three types of people in this world. Those that can count, and those that can't!

  10. #10
    Member Ben Waimata's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Micky Duck View Post
    ummmm we do have thousands of Japanese who visit here every year and if you do a bit of research into the goings on in WW2 particularly in reguards to P.O.W.s treatment at the hands of the Japanese you will possibly realise we have a huge capacity for forgiveness....given enough time.
    Yeah tourism per se is one thing, but a Gallipoli equivalent where 3rd, 4th,5th generation young people of the invader side come specifically for remembering the one event, seems a different thing to me. I've said for years that maybe ANZAC day should be moved to 19th February instead, remembering the day in 1942 when the Japanese airforce bombed Darwin, and the ANZAC forces for the first time were in a position to defend our homeland(s), rather than invade someone elses. I guess this is a hobby horse for me, don't know why. Defending your home is just an easier ethical position to support than invading someone else.

    Re POW, we had our own bad experiences with dead Japanese POWs in NZ..... (Featherston, 1943). But yeah I know people who lost their fathers in Japanese POW camps and a lot of serious crap went on, but Japanese culture is unrecognisable now compared to the war years too.

    Those of us born since WW2 have a lot to be thankful for,not having to go through conscription and the horror of war. All credit to our citizens who have served in the armed forces, but I'm very grateful I never had to go.

 

 

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