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Thread: laminate floating floors

  1. #1
    Member Savage1's Avatar
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    laminate floating floors

    Anyone had any experience with the vinyl plank type floors? I've got about 50sqm of flooring to do and I'm looking at either the click together floating type or the glue down plank types.

    I'm going to have a crack at it myself, like everything else. Not sure whether to pull off the skirting boards or undercut them, can't seem to find any undercut/jamb saws though.

    This what I'm thinking:
    http://www.tradex.global/product-cat...-wpc-flooring/

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Savage1 View Post
    Anyone had any experience with the vinyl plank type floors? I've got about 50sqm of flooring to do and I'm looking at either the click together floating type or the glue down plank types.

    I'm going to have a crack at it myself, like everything else. Not sure whether to pull off the skirting boards or undercut them, can't seem to find any undercut/jamb saws though.

    This what I'm thinking:
    Vinyl WPC Flooring Supply and Installation in Auckland
    Do they have a proprietry edge angle to cover the expansion gap? If your not very careful undercutting the skirtings could be a fuck up. It's a piece of piss to lay otherwise.

  3. #3
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    I’ve put down both vinyl and “wooden” floating floor. The click in wooden was easier than the vinyl and the vinyl was not accurate to install. If everything is flat and corners square I found in fun to install, all floating on a GOOD quality underlay!
    Last edited by Maca49; 27-09-2017 at 06:44 PM.
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  4. #4
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    I wouldn’t undercut the skirtings, fit tight or a coloured silicone.
    Last edited by Maca49; 27-09-2017 at 06:42 PM.
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  5. #5
    Member Savage1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve123 View Post
    Do they have a proprietry edge angle to cover the expansion gap? If your not very careful undercutting the skirtings could be a fuck up. It's a piece of piss to lay otherwise.
    Sorry I'm not sure what you mean.

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    Are your skirtings down already?
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maca49 View Post
    Are your skirtings down already?
    Sure are, been in the house since April, just couldn't decide which flooring to go with, I might just rip them off and get the father in law back up to help replace them. I think if I just undercut them I'll struggle to fit the boards at the ends.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Savage1 View Post
    Sorry I'm not sure what you mean.
    You should leave @ 5mm gap around the edges to allow for expansion with a floating floor. You can get an aluminium C chanel type profile for the edges, caulk them or pop the skirting off, rip it down the thickness of the flooring and put it back on.
    Go for the floating rather then the glued down. It's way faster and a heap easier. It's also easier to remove later if you want to change it. We've just finished an apartment building with the floating type in 83 apartments and glued down american oak in 1. The only advantage to going to solid boards and gluing them is so you can sand and polyurethane for a perfectly smooth floor.
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  9. #9
    Sako & Anshultz!! Sako 243's Avatar
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    If you're going with a LVT (luxury vinyl tile/plank) option, they will generally need to be glued down with the right glue. These get cut inside the skirtings and not undercut. Adhesive, trowel, some stringline and a roller and you're good to go.

    If you're looking for a PVC floating floor click planks, they WILL expand and contract. They MUST be undercut with expansion gaps around the perimeter. Different clicking systems require different install techniques to ensure they lock correctly, otherwise the first hot day sees them expand, then it cools down and they all unclick and you'll have gaps everywhere. Check spec/install sheets for them as many insist you must still glue down in direct sun areas etc. Still able to be DIY install, just ask lots of questions first.

    If looking at laminate, they are more stable than the PVC options. The main ones are still an HDF backing. Some most have water resistant ratings to one degree or another. None are water proof and I don't recommend any in typical wet areas like bathroom or laundries. Some of the top end options have ply backing/body. Check the class rating. Most are the same, but the Krono Swiss Giant has one of the higher ratings in NZ. These are easy to install once the undercutting is sorted. The middle of the room is easy, but a bit fiddly around perimeter profiling. Again, different products have various pros and cons. More knack than difficult, none of it rocket science. The Valinge 5G clicking system I believe is one of the best. AC5 is a good rating for the surface.

    Some of the newer WCP (wood plastic composites - but without the wood part these days) like in your link are getting very stable. I am not familiar with that exact product. We are testing a product at present that we have has sitting submerged half in water for 2-3 weeks without any problem. We are testing thermal stability and surface ratings at present.

    With ANY of the above floors,please don't skimp on floor prep. If concrete, and a new slab, it should be good to go,but if it's particle board/timber flooring, most manufacturers will recommend a 4-6mm sheeting to prevent the subfloor movement affecting the installed floor. Check for level etc. If undercutting, don't make it too tight, as the planks need to move freely. A guide some technical reps try to feed their business cards or a fine steel rule in between to check.

    Welcome to PM me if you want more info/help.

    John
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  10. #10
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    @Savage1 I'd take those skirtings off If I where you!
    The best way to do this with out smashing up the paint work on the wall above is to use a sharp snap off box cutter.
    Run this along the top of the skirting to cut the seal between the skirting paint and wall paint.
    Then if it's just nailed on use a big broad blade and hit this down between nails. Use another broad blade above and behind the blade to help with protection from the hammer blows. The skirts will then start to pop off.
    You will need to muck about with your 45s to get them out.
    Starting on an external corner is better as you will find that the internal ones are a bit of a pain.
    Once the skirting is off and if in good condition then number them knock the nails out and sand down don't fill the nail holes till there back on the wall if you then go up a size in nail you can use the same hole I put a bit of no more gaps on the back to help it stick. ( works just as well as no nails and cheaper)
    If you have glued and screwed then they will be harder to take off. Best to chuck away and start a new.
    But you can give them knotting solution, undercoat and top coat before fitting. Save you time and your knees on the decoration front latter. Just make sure that you Prime the bottom edge of the skirting. Will help stop swelling of the board later if you mop the floor. Don't forget the business card trick as mentioned above when refitting.
    I'd not use quarter round bead looks cheap IMO.
    One last thing (if someone has covered this sorry for repeating) when you fit the flooring use a white rubber mallet to really make sure that they have clicked into place! You can also use a big plastic our wooden block to protect the edge that your hitting.
    Hope this helps.
    It's all fun and games till Darthvader comes along
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  11. #11
    Sako & Anshultz!! Sako 243's Avatar
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    Forgot to mention, a biscuit cutter is a good option if you want to leave skirtings in place and undercut. You'll struggle to get as clean a job as removing and re fitting.

  12. #12
    SGR
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    Rip the skirtings off

  13. #13
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    i prefer carpet, as it makes for a softer landing for my brass.
    Use enough gun

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    You need an accurate compound mitre saw and jigsaw and a small hand plane, all with good blades
    Boom, cough,cough,cough

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    Built my house near on 15 years ago now and all our hard surface flooring is the vinyl type planking. Non wet areas use a water base glue, all wet areas (eg bathrooms) use a solvent glue. This was expensive stuff in the day. The 'planks' of vinyl are super hard wearing and have really stood the test of time (eg where the bar stools are and the breakfast bar - barely a mark on the floor and we eat there for every meal). Wife has dropped a kitchen knife a couple of times and the floor covering is so hard that it chipped the floor and snapped the tip off my expensive Wusthof knife.

 

 

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