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Thread: One for the dad's / mums

  1. #1
    GSP Mad Munsey's Avatar
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    One for the dad's / mums

    Coddled kids a crying shame
    Last updated 13:00 03/01/2014

    JAMES GREENLAND

    Computer games, junk food, political correctness and apathetic parents are inhibiting Kiwi kids' development, says physical educator Lee Corlett.

    He has seen children cry because the grass on their school field hurts their bare feet, and kids who are so obese that they can't get up off the ground without help.

    "This is what our parents are doing to some of our children. It's tragic, it's awful," he said.

    Mr Corlett, of Sporting Initiative Nelson, every week teaches hundreds of Nelson children to "run, jump, throw, hop, skip, and catch, really well".

    He adores his job but says he is dismayed by many Nelson youngsters' lack of physical skills and confidence, which he said were standard 20 years ago, before "PC gone nuts".

    "School teachers don't have time any more, and mums and dads don't have time any more.

    "My job is to try and create a habit in the child's mind that physical activity is real cool. And the hope is that will stay there for the rest of their lives.

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    "The physically capable children we are working with in Nelson tend to be the more academically capable child later on. That's cool," Mr Corlett said.

    But parental apathy, and a lack of appreciation of the importance of physical activity for a child's development, is affecting children's attitudes toward exercise, something Mr Corlett fears will stay with them their entire lives.

    "I'll go to the park down the street from our house and I'll see mum sitting there with her children. While they are playing, mum's busy on the cellphone. There's no interaction. It's really sad."

    Lazy parenting also affected a child's work ethic, he said.

    "Lots of New Zealand children don't have any perseverance. Lots of things are done by mum and dad, because it's quicker for mum to do it than for Johnny to learn to tie up his laces."

    However, children didn't learn anything that way, other than reliance on their parents, Mr Corlett said.

    He said his programme encouraged kids to get stuck into physical activities and to push themselves further than they otherwise would, in a safe and supported environment.

    "We'll tell them why we do [an activity], and how it will help them later in life with sport or whatever. And we don't give the option of not doing it. I will help them until they get it."

    He is imploring parents to do the same, so they can take an active role in their child's physical development.

    Five minutes a day of activities was all it took, he said. Parents should also allow their children to experiment, to go outside their comfort zones and perhaps their parents' comfort zones. "If they climb a tree, let them climb a tree. It's a good thing."

    It was also essential to create a balanced lifestyle, he said, "making art a part of their lives, physical activity a part of their lives, and, of course, schoolwork a part of their lives".

    Four traits were common indicators that a child would succeed later in life, Mr Corlett said.

    "Confidence, perseverance, a ‘give anything a go' attitude, and listening well. It's all about attitude, and so much of that comes from parents."

    Before establishing Sporting Initiative Nelson, Mr Corlett was general manager at Sport Tasman, and head of the sport and recreation department at the Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology.

    He also has more than 20 years' experience as a physical trainer with the New Zealand Army.

    Despite some of his concerns, Mr Corlett is passionate about his job and the kids he teaches.

    He reckons he knows almost every preschooler in Nelson by name, and hopes to meet even more of the region's promising sports stars when he expands his programme to include rural area schools in 2014.

    "I just love working with kids."

    - © Fairfax NZ News

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    veitnamcam and stingray like this.
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  2. #2
    OPCz Rushy's Avatar
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    Good on him. I totally agree.
    It takes 43 muscle's to frown and 17 to smile, but only 3 for proper trigger pull.
    What more do we need? If we are above ground and breathing the rest is up to us!
    Rule 1: Treat every firearm as loaded
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    Rule 4: Identify your target beyond all doubt
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    Rule 7: Avoid alcohol and drugs when handling firearms

  3. #3
    Semper excretia Ryan's Avatar
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    Well thankfully we all enjoy spending time outdoors so our kids should be okay.
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    "I would rather suffer under imperfect freedom, than languish under perfect control".

  4. #4
    Resident Curmudgeon Kiwi Sapper's Avatar
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    Sadly, this is wasted upon the thinking "Mums and dads" who may read and understand JAMES GREENLAND's report.....They already know this and act accordingly to avoid this appalling scenario. They need no warnings.
    It is the parents, "Dumbed Down" by the PC Wizards or their own laziness who need to take note: but as they neither read nor understand the issues that they are breeding, .............Heigh Ho.
    It was a confusion of ideas between him and one of the lions he was hunting in Kenya that had caused A. B. Spottsworth to make the obituary column. He thought the lion was dead, and the lion thought it wasn't.

  5. #5
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    Victims of capitalism.
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  6. #6
    Semper excretia Ryan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Towely View Post
    Victims of capitalism.
    Perhaps but the alternatives are no better.
    kiwi39 likes this.
    "I would rather suffer under imperfect freedom, than languish under perfect control".

  7. #7
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    You get good compulsory military training under communism! In a submarine if your really lucky bastard!
    I managed to get all my grand kids out in the boat on the weekend, oh the horror of the bumps, the noise, the fish,the spray. But my son and I proved them wrong, everybody had a ball. Only hard bit was trying to explain killing the fish by bleeding them. When she got back to her mum all excited and said we had some fish, her mum asked what we were going to name them? She looked at her and said" mum were not going to name them! They're dead, were going to eat them. Definite win! Pops boat pretty good now!
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    Boom, cough,cough,cough

  8. #8
    Member mikee's Avatar
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    I'm glad I don't have kids. They would hate me cause I am real big on diy (do it your self or at least try)

    Although I am not a parent from what I observe with my friends / workmates it would seem, parents these days are more interested in being their kids "friends" rather than their parents.
    Constantly bailing them out of the poo. Buying the everything, doing everything for them

    Hell my wife had a mother come in the other day to her work looking for a job for her daughter (who was standing right beside her mum). When my wife asked her some questions mum answered before she could reply................

    i believe (Contrary to current trendy beliefs) failure is an important part of growing up / learning.

    I think if I had kids they would hate me...............

  9. #9
    Almost literate. veitnamcam's Avatar
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    Na Mikee you have it all wrong, they wouldn't hate you they would respect you.
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    "Hunting and fishing" fucking over licenced firearms owners since ages ago.

  10. #10
    Semper excretia Ryan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikee View Post
    I'm glad I don't have kids. They would hate me cause I am real big on diy (do it your self or at least try)

    Although I am not a parent from what I observe with my friends / workmates it would seem, parents these days are more interested in being their kids "friends" rather than their parents.
    Constantly bailing them out of the poo. Buying the everything, doing everything for them

    Hell my wife had a mother come in the other day to her work looking for a job for her daughter (who was standing right beside her mum). When my wife asked her some questions mum answered before she could reply................

    i believe (Contrary to current trendy beliefs) failure is an important part of growing up / learning.

    I think if I had kids they would hate me...............
    I am a parent, albeit a new one. My parents were not and will never be my friends, they are my parents and big as I am now, I will always be their little boy.

    When I was younger I found my father to be most aloof and compliments from him were rare and treasured. Often I hated him for the harsh discipline that he imposed but at the same time I was a complete reprobate and thoroughly deserved whatever I received. Many times I was left to contemplate the words "One day you'll thank me" which, at the time seemed completely nonsensical.

    With the benefit of some 20+ years of hindsight I can see and be thankful for not ever having received an easy out. The values which he instilled in me continue to hold me in good stead today and it wasn't as if he was some sort of Confucius either. The basics have served me very well, respect for your elders, respect women, good manners, self-discipline and to have pride in whatever you do. If you fail, you fail - you've nobody else to blame except yourself. Prepare better, try harder.

    It is this that I intend to pass down to my kids - not some pussified contemporary idea of how other people (govt / media) expect children to be raised.
    Last edited by Ryan; 03-01-2014 at 09:26 PM.
    "I would rather suffer under imperfect freedom, than languish under perfect control".

  11. #11
    Member mikee's Avatar
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    My dad was never my "friend" growing up.

    He was very firm but also very fair as far as dads go.

    Taught me many things, more than he probably realises. He is my hero as corny as it sounds!

  12. #12
    Semper excretia Ryan's Avatar
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    I hear you Mikee 100%. My dad, similar. Looking back I feel quite guilty about the stupid shit and heartache that I caused.
    "I would rather suffer under imperfect freedom, than languish under perfect control".

  13. #13
    Member mikee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan View Post
    I hear you Mikee 100%. My dad, similar. Looking back I feel quite guilty about the stupid shit and heartache that I caused.
    I feel the same, and I suspect we would not be alone with those thoughts either.....................

  14. #14
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    Never really got to know my dad, different times, he worked all the time, 7:30 am - 6:30pm everyday and 6:00 am - 12:00 PM Sats. Then he was in his workshop, well equipped to say the least and I played, self taught myself in his absence. Mum bound the family together. In hindsight he gave us a great childhood better than some. He had a heart attack at 42 which changed him for the worse, then had the miss fortune of our mum dying when he was 56. I see it all now and treasure what I have, but those bloody traits of his run through me and I have to consciously sort myself out from time to time. He was also a product of his childhood. Loving and cherishing your children is so important. Funny I find it so much easier with my grand kids, maybe I've learnt on my journey
    Munsey, mikee and Ryan like this.
    Boom, cough,cough,cough

  15. #15
    Member mikee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maca49 View Post
    Never really got to know my dad, different times, he worked all the time, 7:30 am - 6:30pm everyday and 6:00 am - 12:00 PM Sats. Then he was in his workshop, well equipped to say the least and I played, self taught myself in his absence. Mum bound the family together. In hindsight he gave us a great childhood better than some. He had a heart attack at 42 which changed him for the worse, then had the miss fortune of our mum dying when he was 56. I see it all now and treasure what I have, but those bloody traits of his run through me and I have to consciously sort myself out from time to time. He was also a product of his childhood. Loving and cherishing your children is so important. Funny I find it so much easier with my grand kids, maybe I've learnt on my journey

    A grandparents job is to enjoy their grand kids and trust that if they have done their job right their parents will do good job raising them.

 

 

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