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Thread: RESPECT

  1. #1
    sturg4
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    RESPECT

    Do we show the game we kill enough respect. I dont think we do and in this way I have been as guilty as the next man. In some European cultures a piece of moss is placed in the dead animals mouth as a sign of respect. When a young hunter shoots his first animal the tail is removed and a little blood splashed on each of the young hunters cheeks. Other cultures make up poems or songs to celebrate the hunt and the killing of an animal.

    But I watch as the young guys hunting with me go up and grab the animal by the leg and drag it out of the bush at the same time reaching for their knife. Killing rather than hunting. A sign that they get too many animals just to bloody to easy.

    Remember when you kill that this animal has come a long way to meet you here at this spot. This animal has given everything to you, its life, its meat, its skin, and its antlers. Remember too, this animal has given much more than this, it has given you the reason you needed to be out in the mountains...it has given you the excitement of the stalk, and it has given you the reason and a time to spend around the campfire with your mates.

    All you have to give in return to this animal is a little bit of respect.

    Next time take a few minutes, sit next to the animal and run your hand along its flanks, touch the softness of its antlers, admire it, tell it how beautiful it is. It has come so far to meet you.

    One morning about 11 oclock I was cruising through the horse paddock in an area called Makirikiri on my way home from a morning shot, not even particulary alert when a jaunty young jap stag came marching through the open paddock straight toward me. It was late spring and this animal as I watched it was just ambling along in the open almost dancing. Maybe it had never walked on grass before. The first thing I noticed was that it had a collar around its neck. Nevertheless almost before I realised it the 222 sprang up to my shoulder and the poor thing was lying dead on the ground.
    It was as most of you who know sika can guess a beautiful animal, with its new summer coat that just gleamed like a foxs coats in the spring sunshine complete with its array of most pronounced white spots. It carried the pretty soft white velvet with a trace of pink of the jap stag.

    I took the collar from its neck, wondering where the hell he got it from and carried it with me until I meet my field officer who explained that a woman scientist named Mavis Davidson had been rigging snare collars in the Kawekas to track sika movements. In due course I recieved a letter from Mavis telling me it was the first collar ever retrieved from the Ruahine's.

    It made me think. This animal had been born in another set of mountains and everyday he had a dozen choices of whether to turn left or right at a fork in the track. If just once during his wanderings he had have turned right instead of left he would not have walked into the snare that put the collar around his neck. In the months that this young stag wore that collar and travelled all that way from the Kawekas, If he had of only once taken a right fork instead of a left, turned upstream instead of down he would not have met me on that spot where I killed him.

    Myself I think he was destined to meet me at that spot. He came a long way to do that. Every day of his life this poor creature thought he was making the choices...but had destiny already decided what choices he would make?????.
    DAF, Spanners, crzyman and 7 others like this.

  2. #2
    OPCz Rushy's Avatar
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    Profoundly deep Scribe and it makes me reflect on the fact that we hunt not to kill but kill to have hunted successfully. What you speak of in terms of offering respect to the animal is very well demonstrated in one of the Graf Boys videos by their father who on shooting a Sambar in the Wanganui area takes considerable moment to thank the animal. If you think about the number of times Mr Graf senior must have done that through the years (in his time taking animals as a meat hunter) I am sure it would add up to several months of paying homage.

  3. #3
    sturg4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rushy View Post
    Profoundly deep Scribe and it makes me reflect on the fact that we hunt not to kill but kill to have hunted successfully. What you speak of in terms of offering respect to the animal is very well demonstrated in one of the Graf Boys videos by their father who on shooting a Sambar in the Wanganui area takes considerable moment to thank the animal. If you think about the number of times Mr Graf senior must have done that through the years (in his time taking animals as a meat hunter) I am sure it would add up to several months of paying homage.
    I like what you said and thankyou.

    Yes I know the Graf boys well and I have had the old man come and pay a visit, he is a good chap.

    The boys and I have worked together on a couple of projects.

    I touched on this theme of "an animal travelling so far to meet you at this place" in my first book. Since then my thoughts on this matter have expanded considerably. I dont think you can live so long in the bush without such thoughts starting to make themselves felt.

    A little spirituality doesnt hurt anyone I dont think.

  4. #4
    ebf
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    Scribe, thanks for that.

    Was watching a video of two guys hunting goats a couple of days ago, and the lack of respect for the animal was what struck me most. Maybe the shooter was a newby, but not clear on where the shots landed, swearing all the time, and not even bothering to finish off an animal that was quite obviously not dead...

    Good to know there are stil some folks around who have your kind of attitude towards hunting.

  5. #5
    Member eltoro's Avatar
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    I've always considered life in whatever form to be a scared thing. Don't get me wrong though, I'm not about to lose my shit if someone swats a mosquito or fly. But I'm not into blowing an animal away just for kicks. I think having respect for animals is a good attitude to instill in kids too.

  6. #6
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    I spent a very hot week one January several years ago hunting chital out of Charters Towers in Northern Queensland.

    The other hunter in camp was an older Aussie who had hunted with my guide several times before , and was pretty particular in what animal he wanted. Any way , I bagged my stag on day three of the hunt , a very nice specimen but not earth shattering. Anyways , Bruce , the other guy , walked miles and miles and looked at hundreds of deer , many of them far bigger than mine , but he hadnt found the right one .

    I know this is going on a bit but bear with me...

    Last morning of the hunt , I am out with the 2 guides and Bruce and his missus . We had stalked in on a likely spot and were checking out the activity over the side of the small face were on. There was about the best stag I had seen in 6 days . A ripper , everything you could want and a bit bigger with it . So , Bruce smokes this stag with his 300 Win Mag from about 150 metres , a good shot . We wandered down to the beast and Bruce sauntered up to it and ... kicked it !

    Well , I have to say that was the worst example of having no respect whatsoever for a truly magnificent animal that he had worked pretty hard to get . I tell you , I was pretty disgusted , as was the two guides ....

    So - yes - I do also believe we have a tendency to not appreciating the animals we hunt . This is the worst example I can recall , but I get annoyed at folk who shoot the humble goat badly and dont bother to follow up the wounded ones , or cant be bothered looking hard for blood signs on the critturs that run away.

    I dont make a silent prayer to an animal I kill , but I do attempt to be respectfull in my dealings with that animal , and am attempting to pass that on to my sone as he progresses in his hunting acheivements. I think its the least we can do .
    scottrods, falconhell and Dougie like this.
    Cats have nine lives-which makes them ideal for experimentation...

  7. #7
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    When I sit down in the mountains to eat lunch during a hunt I thank God for the wonderful country we live in, for those who set in place the laws that allow me to hunt, those who brought the animals here, dragging them by ox and cart into the high country to release, those who gave their lives in 2 world wars to protect our freedom and just feel very humbled.

  8. #8
    Almost literate. veitnamcam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottrods View Post
    When I sit down in the mountains to eat lunch during a hunt I thank God for the wonderful country we live in, for those who set in place the laws that allow me to hunt, those who brought the animals here, dragging them by ox and cart into the high country to release, those who gave their lives in 2 world wars to protect our freedom and just feel very humbled.
    Amen to that
    "Hunting and fishing" fucking over licenced firearms owners since ages ago.

  9. #9
    K95
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    Pretty hard to sum it up.Respect is somewhere you arrive through experience, some people never arrive there in their lifetimes though and I think arriving at a healthy respect for the animal you hunt sets apart the great hunters from the rest. Only new borns and liars have never done something they regret or are ashamed of. I've done plenty.

    I once was happy to shoot a stag and take the antlers only.Now at this stage in my hunting life that's no longer acceptable and making the most of my shot game is very important to me.

  10. #10
    Member EeeBees's Avatar
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    There is that moment in one's hunting when to lower the barrel and simply watch a magnificent animal graze his way up the gully means more than pulling the trigger.

 

 

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