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Thread: 1st wild pig - advice

  1. #16
    Member Chur Bay's Avatar
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    IPork goes bad incredibly quick in the summer if you don't have a chiller it needs to get into the fridge or freezer quick. Either that day or first thing next morning. Hopefully it hasn't spoiled.
    Micky Duck and JLF like this.

  2. #17
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    Thanks all.
    Broke it down and it looked and smelt choice.
    Vac sealed and in the freezer.

    Hopefully the first of many
    rugerman, Chur Bay, MB and 2 others like this.

  3. #18
    Member Micky Duck's Avatar
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    roast it and make sure to have plenty of apple sauce to go with it.....apple baby food will do at a pinch...but peel 3-4 apples,cut up small ish,add couple teaspoons of sugar and about 1/4 cup of water,maybe little more depending on how dry apples are, microwave for couple of minutes untill you can mash it down/up to mush...really helps if roast is a little dry...and simply just "goes" with pork.
    Trout, rugerman, Bill999 and 2 others like this.

  4. #19
    JLF
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    Let's go in parts, said Jack:
    1- It is not advisable to leave a dead animal without cold for so long.
    2- It is always advisable to carry out tests for trichinosis in both pigs and wild boars. To do this, meat samples are taken from the jaw and taken to laboratories for the corresponding analyzes.
    3- Once the viscera are removed, to remove more hair from the leather, we put water to boil, and with jugs we pour it starting at the head, and with rags, we remove the hair. Always keeping the water boiled. We finish the job with a razor to shave the animal. So it's very clean.
    4- Usually we roast the entire suckling pig, on the pole or on the grill, over double heat, from the bottom and from the top. The pig eats everything, or almost everything.
    5- If I freeze the meat, after defrosting it, marinate the meat, with a mixture of aromatic herbs, garlic and wine, I sprinkle it with that mixture the night before cooking the meat.
    Last edited by JLF; 01-01-2022 at 02:07 AM.
    Trout likes this.
    There is still gunpowder left, the Grim Reaper can wait.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by country cuts View Post
    Probably find it was t spiralis make sure you don't feed it to animals or they will get it to. Freezing for 21 days or cooking past 72 degrees Celsius will kill it to
    You can not see Trichinella spiralis cysts in meat with the naked eye. Heavily infected meat has hundreds/thousands of cysts per gram of infected muscle. You need to send samples to the lab for testing to diagnose. As far as I'm aware it is not an issue in NZ. There is only one reported case group in the literature linked (from memory) to somebody selling home reared pigs over the Thames/Coromandel direction
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  6. #21
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    Trichinosis is incredibly rare in NZ (only handful of cases in last 50 odd years) If it hasn't gone sour and is cooked to proper internal temperature you will be sweet.
    country cuts and JLF like this.

  7. #22
    JLF
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    Quote Originally Posted by Preacher View Post
    Trichinosis is incredibly rare in NZ (only handful of cases in last 50 odd years) If it hasn't gone sour and is cooked to proper internal temperature you will be sweet.
    Proper cooking of meat kills the trichinosis parasite.
    It is good that in your country there are no cases of trichinosis.
    There is still gunpowder left, the Grim Reaper can wait.

 

 

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