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Thread: goat stew differing results, any ideas ?

  1. #16
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    you can try shan papaya powder meat tenderiser. can get it from indian stores
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  2. #17
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    @dannyb, look up use of proteolytic enzymes to tenderise meat. It breaks down protein chains. Found in kiwifruit, tamarillo and a couple other fruits. Pineapple has heaps. If you get a sore gob after eating heaps of pineapple as a kid, that was the pineapple eating you.
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  3. #18
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    Any meat can be cooked tender if you cook it slow and keep it moist.

    Fat and connective tissue helps keeps meat moist and tender..why cuts like shoulder and shin or shank meat, brisket and short ribs are favored for long slow cooking. Tender cuts are not suited for slow cooking, cook them too long, even covered in liquid, and they turn into cardboard. So for e.g. beef, rump steak is ok for casserole if you brown pieces and then only give them 20-30 min in the oven in the casserole dish. Which means you "bake" the rest of the casserole ingredients somewhat and then add the meat. Shin makes a far better casserole, you brown it and cook all ingredients in the oven at the same time.

    For goat I much prefer to slow cook on the bone. I will often take the shoulder and let my mate have the legs. But legs are fine if you poach them in your marinade liquid tightly covered, same as for shoulder, but for less time.

    A curry is essentially a casserole. Treat it the same. If the meat is chewy you have not cooked it long enough. If it is dried out and stringy like chewing wet cardboard it is likely a tender cut that has been overcooked.

    So try and fast roast or fry tender cuts, slow cook or casserole the others.

    To slow cook you start with high temp..Brown the meat in a pan or casserole dish in batches on the stove top if pieces, sear a joint at 200C in an open roasting pan in the oven, turning it once, for 15min. Rub both with olive oil first. Then for either add all ingredients to the oven dish, cover tightly, foil for joint to seal the roasting dish, lid for pieces in a casserole, and turn the temp down to 100C and leave for the duration. Say 2-3 hrs for a large goat leg, 3-4 hours for a shoulder, 1.5 hours for pieces in a casserole dish. For the joint, turn the oven off but leave joint in there undisturbed for a min of another hour or until ready to serve in 2-3 hours. For the pieces remove from oven and reheat later if required.
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  4. #19
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    let it rest in fridge for up to week before cooking it will help too...I do this to most meat before freezing now and it has made world of difference.

    treat goat like lamb/hoggot and you wont go far wrong....yearling hind quarter is rather good roasted....
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  5. #20
    Not even Banned ow dannyb's Avatar
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    It seems I am a victim of my own time constraints, in my rush to process all 6 in limited spare time, I didn't bother seperating the different cuts, literally there are back steaks, rump, shoulder and shanks all boned out and mixed together.
    Guess I'll just slow cook the lot till its tender and learn from it
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  6. #21
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    I know an indian guy that makes nice goat curry he uses a pressure cooker
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  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Russian 22. View Post
    you can try shan papaya powder meat tenderiser. can get it from indian stores
    @dannyb Yogiji's in Sydenham (used to be by south city) is a great market for curry powder, spices and mixes etc. Indian supermarket. Last time I went to Pak n save currie powder was a few dollars a box of 30grams ...these guys sell it from a bulk bin by the kg!!!!!!!

    https://yogijis.co.nz/

    Curry powder $15 per kg
    https://yogijis.co.nz/hot-curry-powder.html

    Kashmiri Chilli powder $16 per kg (I use Kashmiri as it has a stronger flavour but less intense heat...)
    https://yogijis.co.nz/kashmiri-chilli-powder-1kg.html

    Also you did not specify Nanny , Billy or kid.. That makes a huge difference. We roast the little uns, (like milk fed lamb - so tender it falls off the bone- cannot slice it.....Nanny we treat like mutton...Billy we treat like currency (give it to the mates neighbours who are indian...) We boned out a whole lot of nanny's once to get made into sausages. they were really nice - mostly. We must have got a billy leg in the mix xomehow. Bites went something like - nice sausage, nice sausage , nice sausage , I can see the billy goat , smell the billy goat, taste the billy goat , nice sausage..... The Billys have a tougher gamier billy flavour right through the meat. It works ina strong indian curry etc as it is able to push through the spices and flavours that compete with it, but nanny meat is far more subtle and works well with milder or softer flavours such as beer / tomatoes etc....
    Last edited by timattalon; 11-10-2021 at 12:36 AM.
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  8. #23
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    Adding the beer (500ml?) probably lowered the temperature of the pot by a few degrees, suspect longer cooking time at a lower temp is your answer
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  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by timattalon View Post
    @dannyb Yogiji's in Sydenham (used to be by south city) is a great market for curry powder, spices and mixes etc. Indian supermarket. Last time I went to Pak n save currie powder was a few dollars a box of 30grams ...these guys sell it from a bulk bin by the kg!!!!!!!

    https://yogijis.co.nz/

    Curry powder $15 per kg
    https://yogijis.co.nz/hot-curry-powder.html

    Kashmiri Chilli powder $16 per kg (I use Kashmiri as it has a stronger flavour but less intense heat...)
    https://yogijis.co.nz/kashmiri-chilli-powder-1kg.html

    Also you did not specify Nanny , Billy or kid.. That makes a huge difference. We roast the little uns, (like milk fed lamb - so tender it falls off the bone- cannot slice it.....Nanny we treat like mutton...Billy we treat like currency (give it to the mates neighbours who are indian...) We boned out a whole lot of nanny's once to get made into sausages. they were really nice - mostly. We must have got a billy leg in the mix xomehow. Bites went something like - nice sausage, nice sausage , nice sausage , I can see the billy goat , smell the billy goat, taste the billy goat , nice sausage..... The Billys have a tougher gamier billy flavour right through the meat. It works ina strong indian curry etc as it is able to push through the spices and flavours that compete with it, but nanny meat is far more subtle and works well with milder or softer flavours such as beer / tomatoes etc....
    Oh yes..

  10. #25
    Member deer243's Avatar
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    Have you guys not heard of slow cookers???
    I do a few stews, beef, goat, venison etc and just chuck it all in the slow cooker and leave it on low for 8 to 12 hours(8 normally fine)
    Always comes out tender as and always good.
    Last stew i did was line the bottom of the slow cooker with potatoes and carrots. In a fry pan fry of some onions, leeks, mushrooms , garlic.
    Throw those in the slow cooker. In same pan brown off what meat you using, ie goat, brown using some tomato paste , throw abit of Paprika in, thyme whatever.
    Throw that in the cooker then season with a little salt, black pepper. Normally chuck in a packet of slow cooker mix, garlic and herb is good, esp for shanks
    Pour in a litre of beef stock, give it a mix around, then chop up a heap of silverbeet and throw in the top, some green beans, cerley, .
    Cover and leave for a min of 8 hours on low.......beauiful.
    Red wine can be used, esp with beef or throw in a can of season diced tomato of dont use stock, all good.(plus beer )

  11. #26
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    honestly the best way to cook goat is to give it to your indian friend, that's what I ended up doing. his middy cooked it up mint and they'd give me an ice cream container full of the stuff in return. He was always extremely appreciative of the gift.
    timattalon and dannyb like this.

  12. #27
    MB
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    Quote Originally Posted by MB View Post
    We slow cook most of our goat drenched in olive oil with Mediterranean dry seasonings. It's great to eat, but occasionally take it off the bone and add to a curry or stew for a change. We eat a lot of goat!
    Did this again tonight and it was awesome. Olive oil, followed by more olive oil, heaps of salt, cumin, coriander, cinnamon and then some more olive oil. 8 hours in the crock pot on low setting. Blowtorch at the end just because I can. Fell off the bone. Even Mrs MB who is scarily vegetarian at times went for a second helping. Wish I'd taken a photo.
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  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by dannyb View Post
    hey team on a recent trip I managed to bag a few goats which I bought home and basically boned it all out and diced it up for stews and curries.
    One night this week the wife made a stew that required beer (ale) in the recipe and it was amazingly good and incredibly tender like literally fall apart tender.
    Later this week she made a different stew recipe that didn't use beer and the goat was quite chewy, still tasted good but wasn't tender like the previous batch, is the beer the difference ? is there anything else I can marinade the goat in to stop it from being chewy ? anyone got any thoughts or experience in this ?
    thanks
    Try marinating in Sprite or lemonade for a good few hours. The fillapino guys I work with do it with most meats, makes it buttery smooth. Look up 'Tocino", it's a pork dish, but the marinades work awesome with goat + time.
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