Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Create Account now to join.
  • Login:

Welcome to the NZ Hunting and Shooting Forums.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.

NZGR Black Watch


User Tag List

+ Reply to Thread
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 46 to 56 of 56
Like Tree22Likes

Thread: .303 ammunition

  1. #46
    Member Carlsen Highway's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Port Chalmers
    Posts
    406
    They were owned by an English company by the 1980's and although I don't know for sure, I always thought they quietly wound it up in the face of competition from American sporting brands.

    Graeme Champion owns the CAC name, has a little cottage industry bringing used rifles into the country from Sweden. I wish I had thought to buy it.
    Put the keyboard down. Now kick it over here.

  2. #47
    Member Cordite's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    NZ Mainland
    Posts
    452
    Colonial Ammunition Company. Not my first choice of a NZ restart company name, what with the POM-sensitivity of some flightless birds.

    How about Empire Shotgun Shells, or Queen's Guns, Dominion Hunting & Fishing, Governor's Gun Oils, etc.
    Guns don't kill people - cars do.

  3. #48
    Member Cordite's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    NZ Mainland
    Posts
    452
    Quote Originally Posted by Carlsen Highway View Post
    You seem like a nice man. You are commended .... public spirited. I doff my hat to you.
    Thanks @Carlsen Highway,

    In deference to everyone else, we are by definition all nice people on NZHS. I know that because we are all government-certified "fit and proper" persons and as such good company, even @systolic who gets a lot of flak. And I must not take credit for defending someone I've never met, it's just that there appeared to be some merit to his (optimistic) statement.
    Guns don't kill people - cars do.

  4. #49
    Member Walker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Mangawhai
    Posts
    86
    I'm sorry if my link offended you Carlton but I only put it up for the un-educated on the history of Enfields. There is a much better site run by Mr.Regwell of Canada, 303british.com as an ex-armourer of .303's he has lots of useful hints on getting the best out of them.

  5. #50
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Tokoroa
    Posts
    463
    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Henry View Post
    There were a number of firearms blown up and attendent shooter injuries associated with CAC hi flyer shotgun ammunition in the late 70s. Compensation was made, the ammo was withdrawn but after extensive testing no definitive explanation could be found. Boxes still turn up in auctions and some of it is probably shot still. Neil Hayes was involved in looking for the cause and has written a few articles over the years on this, and I recall that guns and hunting magazine had a question on it published some time ago.
    I remember that I shot some in my Remington 1100 it bent the action rails and locked up the action no permanent damage the local gunsmith straightened the rails still works fine
    took the ammo back for a replacement never used CAC shot shells again,
    My shooting mentor worked at CAC during WW2 for the Army as quality controller had some great stories to tell about the place knew more about .303 ammo than anybody,
    he said the main reason that CAC folded was that the machinery was worn out and was too expensive to replace
    Carlsen Highway and Cordite like this.

  6. #51
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    137
    Quote Originally Posted by Cordite View Post
    Thanks @Carlsen Highway,

    In deference to everyone else, we are by definition all nice people on NZHS. I know that because we are all government-certified "fit and proper" persons and as such good company, even @systolic who gets a lot of flak. And I must not take credit for defending someone I've never met, it's just that there appeared to be some merit to his (optimistic) statement.
    Unfortunately your loyalty is somewhat misplaced in regards to Mr N Foster , the only reason the Canadian ( Eskimo ) Rangers carry a rifle is because of Polar bears is they don't like being eaten by them .And the no 4's work in the extreme cold .
    His millitary knowledge is hung out to dry by this load of absolute drivel :
    Military tactics also differ. To New Zealanders, it is strange to see a Marine shout or communicate openly. We cringe, we just want to get the hell away. It frays the nerves of NZ soldiers during joint training like nails down a chalk board. We struggle to even watch it on the television, turning our heads away and squinting. Silence and silent communication are a primary virtue of the NZ soldier. We have to turn the clock back to understand the differences.

    During the Vietnam war, large numbers of U.S civilians were drafted to war, many did not want to go, many were extremely young and not ready for what they would encounter. The shout (commonly used in Karate - Kiai) can be used to overcome the freeze reflex and keep everyone moving forwards. The helicopter was also in use which ruined any silent advance.

    I do not know if talking, shouting or the hooooarrrr (sorry, I do not know the current spelling) call was around during the second world war. This style of soldering may well have been around during the second world war as the conditions were the same- drafting, a need to get soldiers moving forwards and so forth.

    We had a large number of Maori through the wars, genetically optimized (survivial of the fittest) to war conditions, thriving in the worst of conditions. I think this influence may have helped set the scene for us. We had drafting but a major proportion of our men were already in the bush living extremely harsh lives in total silence. We have also had limited air and ground support from the beginning through till now. We had to get as close as possible to our enemy in order to seize the element of surprise These days, our air support in the desert is a phone call to U.S forces.

    The U.S army is now split into multiple factions which employ multiple tactics. We simply don't have the man power or coin for that so we have to make do.

    Ironically, during the Vietnam war, although silence was about the only protection an NZ soldier had, both the Australian and NZ forces would use the loud report (noise) of the SLR to help shock the enemy when springing an ambush. The Aussies also had what they called the bitch- a cut down SLR with the semi function doctored so that the SLR would let rip on full auto with a deafening roar and deadly effect though it must have been very hard to control.

    In contrast to these differences, although we place great pride in our quiet stalking skills, U.S hunters introduced the concept of still hunting (including from tree stands) to NZ hunters. A bow hunter could wait in silence without scenting his area by placing his tree stand up high. I once met a highly successful NZ culler who switched to this method (using a rifle out across clearings of up to 250 yards or so). It was interesting to see an already well accomplished hunter adopt this approach. Over the years, I have used a mix of both methods to optimize success during client hunts.

    So like I say, we can learn from each other in different ways. Things that seem odd need to be investigated in order to obtain a greater understanding of cultural differences.

  7. #52
    Member Carlsen Highway's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Port Chalmers
    Posts
    406
    Quote Originally Posted by Tankd View Post
    Unfortunately your loyalty is somewhat misplaced in regards to Mr N Foster , the only reason the Canadian ( Eskimo ) Rangers carry a rifle is because of Polar bears is they don't like being eaten by them .And the no 4's work in the extreme cold .
    His millitary knowledge is hung out to dry by this load of absolute drivel :
    Military tactics also differ. To New Zealanders, it is strange to see a Marine shout or communicate openly. We cringe, we just want to get the hell away. It frays the nerves of NZ soldiers during joint training like nails down a chalk board. We struggle to even watch it on the television, turning our heads away and squinting. Silence and silent communication are a primary virtue of the NZ soldier. We have to turn the clock back to understand the differences.

    During the Vietnam war, large numbers of U.S civilians were drafted to war, many did not want to go, many were extremely young and not ready for what they would encounter. The shout (commonly used in Karate - Kiai) can be used to overcome the freeze reflex and keep everyone moving forwards. The helicopter was also in use which ruined any silent advance.

    I do not know if talking, shouting or the hooooarrrr (sorry, I do not know the current spelling) call was around during the second world war. This style of soldering may well have been around during the second world war as the conditions were the same- drafting, a need to get soldiers moving forwards and so forth.

    We had a large number of Maori through the wars, genetically optimized (survivial of the fittest) to war conditions, thriving in the worst of conditions. I think this influence may have helped set the scene for us. We had drafting but a major proportion of our men were already in the bush living extremely harsh lives in total silence. We have also had limited air and ground support from the beginning through till now. We had to get as close as possible to our enemy in order to seize the element of surprise These days, our air support in the desert is a phone call to U.S forces.

    The U.S army is now split into multiple factions which employ multiple tactics. We simply don't have the man power or coin for that so we have to make do.

    Ironically, during the Vietnam war, although silence was about the only protection an NZ soldier had, both the Australian and NZ forces would use the loud report (noise) of the SLR to help shock the enemy when springing an ambush. The Aussies also had what they called the bitch- a cut down SLR with the semi function doctored so that the SLR would let rip on full auto with a deafening roar and deadly effect though it must have been very hard to control.

    In contrast to these differences, although we place great pride in our quiet stalking skills, U.S hunters introduced the concept of still hunting (including from tree stands) to NZ hunters. A bow hunter could wait in silence without scenting his area by placing his tree stand up high. I once met a highly successful NZ culler who switched to this method (using a rifle out across clearings of up to 250 yards or so). It was interesting to see an already well accomplished hunter adopt this approach. Over the years, I have used a mix of both methods to optimize success during client hunts.

    So like I say, we can learn from each other in different ways. Things that seem odd need to be investigated in order to obtain a greater understanding of cultural differences.
    It makes me cringe so much my eyes water. Dear lord. The tragedy of having both an ego and a lack of talent.

    The idiot doesn't even know what still hunting is.
    Put the keyboard down. Now kick it over here.

  8. #53
    Member Carlsen Highway's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Port Chalmers
    Posts
    406
    Quote Originally Posted by Walker View Post
    I'm sorry if my link offended you Carlton but I only put it up for the un-educated on the history of Enfields. There is a much better site run by Mr.Regwell of Canada, 303british.com as an ex-armourer of .303's he has lots of useful hints on getting the best out of them.
    You didnt offend me. I just thought it time to point out that site is hardly worthy of someone like yourself linking to it, in case you hadn't looked at it properly.

    Steve Ridgewell is a knowledgeable man, I have corresponded with him on matters of mutual interest.
    Put the keyboard down. Now kick it over here.

  9. #54
    Semper excretia Ryan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Ubique
    Posts
    4,937
    Quote Originally Posted by Walker View Post
    I'm sorry if my link offended you Carlton...
    Solo likes this.
    "Awareness buys you time and time buys you options."

    - John Correia

  10. #55
    Member Walker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Mangawhai
    Posts
    86
    Carlton, you'll find I'm in his book under wild cats.

  11. #56
    Member ROKTOY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Nelson
    Posts
    605
    Quote Originally Posted by sneeze View Post
    These are surplus to my requirements. Maybe of some value to someone? Both full boxes

    Attachment 80729
    @sneeze Are these still available? How much are you after for them if they are? Cheers

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. WTB: Importation of Ammunition
    By Remington 5R .300 Win Mag in forum Buy, Sell or Swap
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 27-09-2017, 01:09 AM
  2. 223 ammunition
    By Rock river arms hunter in forum Projectile and Factory Ammo Exchange
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 08-09-2016, 09:28 PM
  3. GECO ammunition
    By logesearle in forum Firearms, Optics and Accessories
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 02-12-2015, 04:49 PM
  4. 308 F4 Ammunition for sale
    By jim160 in forum Buy, Sell or Swap
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 23-05-2015, 03:27 PM
  5. .223 ammunition
    By gimp in forum Firearms, Optics and Accessories
    Replies: 60
    Last Post: 17-05-2015, 02:17 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Welcome to NZ Hunting and Shooting Forums! We see you're new here, or arn't logged in. Create an account, and Login for full access including our FREE BUY and SELL section Register NOW!!