Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Create Account now to join.
  • Login:

Welcome to the NZ Hunting and Shooting Forums.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.

Black Watch DPT


User Tag List

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 36
Like Tree54Likes

Thread: Tips for beginners on not to get lost in the woods?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    4

    Question Tips for beginners on not to get lost in the woods?

    Firstly I would like to apoligise if this has already been covered.

    I am keen to start hunting goats and pigs and would probably start with single day trips near Auckland. I have read a good amount of information regarding advise for beginners but still have some questions I am concerned with.

    The biggest worry I have is getting lost, I assume Phone GPS won't be any good so how would I know which way to go back after 4-5 hours of walking/hiking in random directions and with multiple random turns?

    Any help is much appreciated.

    Thanks
    Alex

  2. #2
    Semper excretia Ryan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    North Island
    Posts
    6,223
    It's folley to rely solely on electronic means for navigation.

    I'd strongly suggest learning how to read a map and use a compass. That's the bread and butter of finding where things are.
    "I would rather suffer under imperfect freedom, than languish under perfect control".

  3. #3
    Member gadgetman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Christchurch
    Posts
    14,821
    Get hold of and read the Mountain Safety Council Bushcraft Manual. It has a wealth of information on navigation amongst other essential skills.

    I just bought this for my Android phone. Has the DOC hunting areas and huts. I've found the GPS in the phone to be very good. It does not require cellular coverage to operate and to prolong battery life switch to aircraft mode so the phone is not constantly searching for a distant tower. You can always grab a power bank to recharge the phone or spare batteries for many phones. https://play.google.com/store/apps/d...ztopo50s&hl=en

    General rules:

    Have a printed map and compass and know how to read and use them together. Printed map should be in a sealed plastic bag as mush as possible.

    I like to set the magnetic offset on an orienteering compass and place it on the map with the base plate parallel with the true north lines on the map. Then rotate the map with the compass on top till the needle lines up with the north offset. This then orients the map with the lay of the land.

    Stop often and look behind you to see where you have come from. This can make it much easier for the return journey or if you have to backtrack.

    Walking streets the rule is 6km/hr, in the bush 3km/hr when travelling. Much, much less if stalking of course. This allows you to plan the timing of your trip.
    stingray, Scouser and 223nut like this.
    There are only three types of people in this world. Those that can count, and those that can't!

  4. #4
    Member gadgetman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Christchurch
    Posts
    14,821
    Of course this version of the software is probably better for you. https://play.google.com/store/apps/d...ztopo50n&hl=en
    There are only three types of people in this world. Those that can count, and those that can't!

  5. #5
    Member Boaraxa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Southland
    Posts
    2,000
    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan View Post
    It's folley to rely solely on electronic means for navigation.

    I'd strongly suggest learning how to read a map and use a compass. That's the bread and butter of finding where things are.
    It,s 2018 He,d probably have to pop into the rsa & shout a few beers to learn that stuff now ! crazy I no but how many young fellas even carry a compass let alone no how to use one , I always found studying maps the best way mostly in mountainous country its pretty easy not to get lost , pic a water catchment & stick to it , its been repeated before but cell phone gps app,s seem popular I took a young fella out last year he showed me his , luckily I only took him to a shit spot iv now got the same (more of a plan b) but stuffed if I can work them properly , iv got 2.. Topo GPS & NZ Topo Map & neither of them are very good not sure if its where the satellites are during the day or what but they seem to have pretty limited use down here , iv got a garmin 64 it works fine but sucks to use doesn't take long to flatten the battery's either if I where to pick another gps it would be the alpha100 the one you use for tracking dogs its awesome touch screen no silly buttons & basic , mark your truck , drop pins & be guided to it wish I only sold the collars now & kept the unit.
    The Green party putting the CON in conservation since 2017

  6. #6
    Member sako75's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Supercity
    Posts
    4,867
    To use a map and compass you need to know where you are. If you know where you are you’re not lost

    Study and take a map
    Start on a track and peel off a short distance then back to the track. Do this and your confidence will grow
    Many great explorers traveled great distances and never had a map
    kimjon and Scouser like this.

  7. #7
    Member Marty Henry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Tararua
    Posts
    3,327
    Quote Originally Posted by sako75 View Post
    To use a map and compass you need to know where you are. If you know where you are you’re not lost

    Study and take a map
    Start on a track and peel off a short distance then back to the track. Do this and your confidence will grow
    Many great explorers traveled great distances and never had a map
    Hansel and Gretel used a trail of breadcrumbs to mark their way, so you can have a snack on the return trip unless the birds get them first.

  8. #8
    Member Ryan_Songhurst's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    South Island
    Posts
    6,548
    Also when you're absolutely hopelessly lost remember water runs downhill, keep following water and you will eventually sort yourself out
    gadgetman and stingray like this.

  9. #9
    Member 40mm's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Jaffa
    Posts
    2,534
    try the local orienteering club.
    Use enough gun

  10. #10
    Member northdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    north auckland area
    Posts
    6,044
    Be constantly aware of your surroundings land marks ridges streams rock formations etc dunno what it is but some young guys I've been with are totally oblivious the whole walk to anything around them also just go as far as your comfortable going as part of the exercise is getting back out again if I'm in a new area for the first time I'll pick a long ridge or creek and just walk up and back not really expecting to shoot anything more to get a feel for the area a ridge is good as you can check both sides of it and stay off your phone and concentrate
    gadgetman and kimjon like this.

  11. #11
    Member kimjon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Waikato
    Posts
    1,628
    The cell phone map apps are very good these days, if not better than a garmin gps. The trick is to cache the information prior to going by doing a virtual tiki tour on your phone of the area you'll hunt. Zoom in/out and scroll around on the screen...your phone will cache this information in its memory and will remember it even without reception. However if you don't pre cache...you'll only see the map on a ridiculous scale, unusable in the Bush.

    Start small, use nature's handrails like streams, ridgelines, farm boundaries...then cut between them. All of this is done firstly on the map, then put it into place by giving it a go in small blocks to see if you can put in into practice. Once again, set a goal, start small...work up to bigger as you gain confidence.

    30 years ago I was terrified of getting lost, but now you could blindfold me, drop me into the middle of anywhere and I'd have the time of my life without a care in the world about getting lost. But I only got to this point by starting small and working up.

    Once you realise the Bush is just lots and lots of triangles then navigation becomes very easy.
    Rossiwiz likes this.

  12. #12
    Member northdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    north auckland area
    Posts
    6,044
    Also some people seem to have a good natural sense of direction
    tiroatedson and Beaker like this.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Mangakino
    Posts
    482
    Check out this post
    https://www.nzhuntingandshooting.co....hniques-22505/

    I think this link will work otherwise use advanced search and search on using compass.
    time out likes this.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Rotorua
    Posts
    100
    Always take a map and compass, learn to orientate the map and take compass bearings. Start small in a small area of bush with open features on most sides (farmland, lake, road) then if you get lost just take a compass bearing to the (hopefully) nearest open area and head out of the bush. There is probably a area near you where you can go after work (no gun) just to get the feel of being in the bush and meet some unfriendly bush. Bush Lawyer, supplejack, blackberry. A patch of bush with footpath / nature walks through it is ideal, just go off the tracks. Most of all enjoy.

  15. #15
    Member Ryan_Songhurst's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    South Island
    Posts
    6,548
    Quote Originally Posted by kimjon View Post
    The cell phone map apps are very good these days, if not better than a garmin gps. The trick is to cache the information prior to going by doing a virtual tiki tour on your phone of the area you'll hunt. Zoom in/out and scroll around on the screen...your phone will cache this information in its memory and will remember it even without reception. However if you don't pre cache...you'll only see the map on a ridiculous scale, unusable in the Bush.

    Start small, use nature's handrails like streams, ridgelines, farm boundaries...then cut between them. All of this is done firstly on the map, then put it into place by giving it a go in small blocks to see if you can put in into practice. Once again, set a goal, start small...work up to bigger as you gain confidence.

    30 years ago I was terrified of getting lost, but now you could blindfold me, drop me into the middle of anywhere and I'd have the time of my life without a care in the world about getting lost. But I only got to this point by starting small and working up.

    Once you realise the Bush is just lots and lots of triangles then navigation becomes very easy.
    My Mrs on the other hand still drives the wrong way out the driveway to go to town which is five minutes away, in the opposite direction...
    veitnamcam, 199p, kimjon and 4 others like this.

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Taxidermy/tanning for beginners
    By mehtat in forum Taxidermy
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 25-06-2018, 12:21 AM
  2. Replies: 13
    Last Post: 14-01-2018, 02:30 PM
  3. Beginners gun
    By oraki in forum Shotgunning
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 21-03-2016, 07:29 PM
  4. How to shit in the woods
    By 199p in forum Off topic
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 03-12-2014, 12:32 AM
  5. Replies: 21
    Last Post: 09-03-2013, 12:49 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Welcome to NZ Hunting and Shooting Forums! We see you're new here, or arn't logged in. Create an account, and Login for full access including our FREE BUY and SELL section Register NOW!!