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Thread: Mark your guns?

  1. #16
    res
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    I use the dna stuff
    Using Tapatalk

  2. #17
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    How on earth do they support their claim to 83% reduction in burglaries ?
    Surely it can only help point the finger and return stolen goods.

    I like the idea but the claim seems a bit rich.

  3. #18
    Member Jexla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moutere View Post
    How on earth do they support their claim to 83% reduction in burglaries ?
    Surely it can only help point the finger and return stolen goods.

    I like the idea but the claim seems a bit rich.
    Same a registry. It's a porky.
    Ryan, Boaraxa and rewa like this.

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by res View Post
    I use the dna stuff
    What happens - if - you sell it?
    I'm just thinking of 3-4 hand after you, it gets used in a crime, DNA registered against you, etc....

    Don't get me wrong, I like the concept, it's just the unintended consequences bit.
    veitnamcam, 300winmag and rewa like this.
    Please excuse spelling, as finger speed is sometimes behind brain spped........ Or maybe the other wayy.....

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jexla View Post
    Same a registry. It's a porky.
    Good point, but doesn't answer the question about preventing burglary as the concept is not just limited to protecting only firearms, but other property also.
    Last edited by Moutere; 11-05-2018 at 12:16 AM.

  6. #21
    Member Cordite's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by veitnamcam View Post
    Not real clued up on law or even English but I thought firearms/weapons used in a crime were generally destroyed like or not?
    @<u><a href="https://www.nzhuntingandshooting.co.nz/member.php?u=71" target="_blank">veitnamcam</a></u>

    It it's your gun and you use it in a crime, yes, destroyed, or maybe a place in a police museum.

    David Bain was cleared of what by implication may have been his father's crime, hence Joe Karam had it back. It was for Joe Karam, not for David Bain, as part of their book rights etc agreement. No doubt to be used for Karam's book.

    If a gun is stolen from me and used in a crime, it is still mine. I have a right to have it back once forensics are completed with it and trial over. Its bloody history would be no worse than many service rifles. Think GC Arisaka or that WW1 SMLE. The fact that I had it get stolen out of my possession in to a criminal's hands would bother me more.

    I asked local AO re standard police procedures for examining recovered firearms, but no details given beyond that they have procedures.

    I assume it would at least include UV light examination.

    There are well developed methods for revealing ground off serial numbers, as the imprint of the serial number causes changes in the metal deeper than the letters themselves, and so to grind them off say the barrel you may need to grind deeper than safely allowed for firing the gun - unless you just want an intimidator.

    Interesting page on serial number restoration: Serial Number Restoration - ppt video online download

    http://slideplayer.com/slide/6020194/
    veitnamcam and rewa like this.
    Guns don't kill people - drivers do.

  7. #22
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    One point is if you apply identifying marks or some such, that if your firearms are taken then you will be notifying the police. When you do this, if you tell them where to look they will know where to look to either find the marks if concealed well enough or to find evidence of the marks removal, increasing the likelihood of getting them back if the police recover them. It certainly wont hurt. Photos of your rifles and the identifying marks is a good idea too.

    On that count most can be replaced. Only the ones that cannot be replaced for sentimental or availability / rarity reasons will cause an issue. In most other cases I would expect insurance would cover replacement.

  8. #23
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    Years back, Police claimed to be able to retrieve serial no's off British bikes, where they had been ground off. I'm pretty sure it only happened if/when, they wanted it to. Criminals back then, quickly learned how to prevent no. recovery. If its a total f-around for them,(Police) I cant see them doing it. If they are recovered close enough to the area they are stolen from, without too much time having passed, I'm sure they can figure it out. I keep bolts etc., well away from from rifles, locked, AND concealed. Often,these muppets even steal incomplete rifles, but at least they wont be able to use mine. There would only be a very limited market for incomplete rifles, and word would quickly get around; that you get the same charges, for a useless piece of wood and steel, as you get for a real (complete) firearm.On a lighter note.. It would be interesting to see the stats on the no. of stolen firearms unrecovered. We could figure-out the risk-factor, based on the birth-rate,with a tricky calculation for the "muppet-rate", to assess saturation-point.... and get cheaper policies
    Cordite likes this.

  9. #24
    Almost literate. veitnamcam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cordite View Post
    @<u><a href="https://www.nzhuntingandshooting.co.nz/members/veitnamcam/" target="_blank">veitnamcam</a></u>

    It it's your gun and you use it in a crime, yes, destroyed, or maybe a place in a police museum.

    David Bain was cleared of what by implication may have been his father's crime, hence Joe Karam had it back. It was for Joe Karam, not for David Bain, as part of their book rights etc agreement. No doubt to be used for Karam's book.

    If a gun is stolen from me and used in a crime, it is still mine. I have a right to have it back once forensics are completed with it and trial over. Its bloody history would be no worse than many service rifles. Think GC Arisaka or that WW1 SMLE. The fact that I had it get stolen out of my possession in to a criminal's hands would bother me more.

    I asked local AO re standard police procedures for examining recovered firearms, but no details given beyond that they have procedures.

    I assume it would at least include UV light examination.

    There are well developed methods for revealing ground off serial numbers, as the imprint of the serial number causes changes in the metal deeper than the letters themselves, and so to grind them off say the barrel you may need to grind deeper than safely allowed for firing the gun - unless you just want an intimidator.

    Interesting page on serial number restoration: Serial Number Restoration - ppt video online download

    http://slideplayer.com/slide/6020194/
    My that computer lady is bloody hard(too slow and frustrating) to listen to!, got the gist of it in a couple of skips threw the vid...coulda been a 30 second vid.
    Cordite likes this.
    Rule 3: Load a firearm only when ready to fire

    Chicken Intolerant.

  10. #25
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    Why anyone would want a stolen gun back is beyond me. Not saying I donít want the police to recover it from the shitkickers that either stole it or subsequently bought it, but once they do, throw that shit in the bin.

    It would never be the same.
    Last edited by Proudkiwi; 11-05-2018 at 10:03 PM.
    veitnamcam, Dreamer, BRADS and 1 others like this.

  11. #26
    Member Cordite's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Proudkiwi View Post
    Why anyone would want a stolen gun back is beyond me. Not saying I don’t want the police to recover it from the shitkickers that either stole it or subsequently bought it, but once they do, throw that shit in the bin.

    It would never be the same.
    @Proudkiwi

    Suppose it depends on the excess of one's house contents insurance. Not sure how I'd feel having my gun back after it taking a trip to the local gang pad. Hard to tell as I've never had any burglarised items returned.
    Guns don't kill people - drivers do.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cordite View Post
    @Proudkiwi

    Suppose it depends on the excess of one's house contents insurance. Not sure how I'd feel having my gun back after it taking a trip to the local gang pad. Hard to tell as I've never had any burglarised items returned.
    Nope. Any rifle that costs less than your average excess could only be considered a disposable item. Again, throw that shit in the bin.
    BRADS likes this.

  13. #28
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    I thought things like serial numbers could be etched back from the ground off bit.

    Sent from my TA-1024 using Tapatalk

  14. #29
    Member canross's Avatar
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    I was thinking about this thread a bit more - an RFID chip in the stock would be a neat trick. They are the little chips in shop clothing, books, and your credit and eftpos cards that are powered by a radio signal to alert security systems or activate paywave at the cashier. They're dirt cheap, can be scanned from a distance, and never really stop working if protected (IE encased in resin etc).

    It would take a little bit of determination on behalf of the owner to do (IE place the chips in the stock, buy a $20 scanner, document the chip ID against the firearm, keep a record) but it would be an invisible but easily checked method of cataloging firearms. Probably would be most effective because thieves probably wouldn't look for it, and if you knew to scan for it, is easily detected without having to disassemble the gun or use complicated or time consuming recovery techniques.
    rossi.45 and Cordite like this.

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by res View Post
    I use the dna stuff
    Tell me more...... on the other hand maybe to much information..I don't want to know lol

 

 

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