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Thread: Tips on bowhunting feral goats

  1. #1
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    Tips on bowhunting feral goats

    What are your tips and tricks for hunting feral goats? How do you manage stalking and tracking them on difficult terrain (like rocky outcrops and deep/steep gorges)? What setup/kit works well for you?

    There are a heap in the region I'm in, laying waste to the bush. Would like to put a dent in their population. In some places, like private land - or land that backs onto DOC managed bush - folk don't want guns around, so bowhunting makes a fine option.

  2. #2
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    Been using a rifle here. My average distance to goats I have shot recently have 15-20 metres. Same rules apply for both bow and rifle Iíd imagine. Cover, concealment, wind direction and noise are the biggies.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Remote likes this.

  3. #3
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    Use binoculars.
    Use a rangefinder.
    Be very patient. Wait for a good angling forward shot into the crease.
    Don't shoot at a moving goat.
    If there are a lot of then use cheap arrows and broadheads. And use the same combo for a long time, practice and hunting.
    Beware the trajectory where the arrow rises above the sightline and smashes into a branch just above.
    Don't try and shoot through bushes.
    Sometimes you mighty have to shoot a second or third arrow at a goat that's not dead yet but don't chase them.
    Carry a piece of rubber inner tube and a pocket knife to dig arrows out of trees and logs.
    Remote likes this.

  4. #4
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    Elaborate on the inner tube and pocket knife trick.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by superdiver View Post
    Elaborate on the inner tube and pocket knife trick.
    Have to do Iím curious myself...


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  6. #6
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    When the arrow is embedded in wood its smooth and sliipery , hard to twist and pull out. Wrap the inner tube around it to get a good grip. Often you can only get the shaft to turn and you can unscrew it off the head. Then cut the head out with the pocket knife. Of course its also possible to get such a strong grip you twist the carbon fibre snapt into a fluff and munt the shaft entirely.
    superdiver likes this.

  7. #7
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    Take ear plugs ,the sound of wounded goats still haunts me to this day from hunting them with bows as young fellas.
    MB, outlander and Remote like this.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bagheera View Post
    When the arrow is embedded in wood its smooth and sliipery , hard to twist and pull out. Wrap the inner tube around it to get a good grip. Often you can only get the shaft to turn and you can unscrew it off the head. Then cut the head out with the pocket knife. Of course its also possible to get such a strong grip you twist the carbon fibre snapt into a fluff and munt the shaft entirely.
    So simple but so effective. Cheers

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Remote View Post
    What are your tips and tricks for hunting feral goats? How do you manage stalking and tracking them on difficult terrain (like rocky outcrops and deep/steep gorges)? What setup/kit works well for you?

    There are a heap in the region I'm in, laying waste to the bush. Would like to put a dent in their population. In some places, like private land - or land that backs onto DOC managed bush - folk don't want guns around, so bowhunting makes a fine option.
    Use a rifle or find goats that you can shoot humanely.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by The bomb View Post
    Take ear plugs ,the sound of wounded goats still haunts me to this day from hunting them with bows as young fellas.
    @Remote how far away can you put yourarrows into a 10 cm circle ? While balancing on a concrete block.

  11. #11
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    I can almost always group within that up to about 25m barebow, but not with the bow canted (which means sitting or squatting shots are out), and I've never tried while balancing on one leg! The rangefinder tip is interesting as in different terrain distance interpretation can alter significantly, especially when shooting at a steep incline (I find).

  12. #12
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    I'm all for killing them as humanely as possible. I'm doing it solely for the bush as they're wiping out the undergrowth, changing the composition of ancient forest. The seedlings don't stand a chance when they're around.

    Many folk don't want hunters with rifles on their land, especially in areas where urban areas encroach on bush. Goats are plentiful in such places here, more so where bush meets paddock. But yes, you're right: in general a rifle is the better way to go in almost all cases. I know a goat culler that goes out and shoots 30-50 a day, he says. I might join him one day, with a 222.

    Here's a good site I found after making this post, where a Kiwi bowhunter goes out and takes down a bunch in a morning:

    https://bowhunterz.com/bowhunting-feral-goats/

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Remote View Post
    I can almost always group within that up to about 25m barebow, but not with the bow canted (which means sitting or squatting shots are out), and I've never tried while balancing on one leg! The rangefinder tip is interesting as in different terrain distance interpretation can alter significantly, especially when shooting at a steep incline (I find).
    That sounds a good enough skill level to go out for a hunt. Most successful hunters try and restrict themselves to under 20m. 30m would only be if something goes wrong but you need a pin set and proven for that distance. One tip I forgot about was to always shoot for the biggest goat. It's got the biggest target zone. You've got plenty of killing power if you can hit the right spot and the arrow will pass through. Often they will stand around for a while before lying down to die. 5-10 minutes is common even with a good shot.

    The concrete block is to get used to less than perfect footing. I could never shoot balancing on one foot either. Do practice kneeling. Due to bow length, you'll need to have both knees together and stretch up high - not like the one knee position for rifles. Also try sitting, perhaps from a chair. Most successful bowhunting is done on easy farmland not steep rocky gorges.

    Vibram 5 fingers would be ideal but are difficult to buy in NZ now. Let me know if you hear of them.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Remote View Post
    I'm all for killing them as humanely as possible. I'm doing it solely for the bush as they're wiping out the undergrowth, changing the composition of ancient forest. The seedlings don't stand a chance when they're around.

    Many folk don't want hunters with rifles on their land, especially in areas where urban areas encroach on bush. Goats are plentiful in such places here, more so where bush meets paddock. But yes, you're right: in general a rifle is the better way to go in almost all cases. I know a goat culler that goes out and shoots 30-50 a day, he says. I might join him one day, with a 222.

    Here's a good site I found after making this post, where a Kiwi bowhunter goes out and takes down a bunch in a morning:

    https://bowhunterz.com/bowhunting-feral-goats/
    It’s unlikely you’ll ever make enough of a dent in their numbers with a bow to affect the outcome for the forest.

    If you are worried about rifle noise, use subsonic loads in a suppressed .308 Win, they are extremely quiet and it is straightforward to clean up half a dozen goats at a time, if you know what you’re doing.

    To the folks “that don’t want guns around”, well I know exactly what you mean as its becoming more and more difficult where I live due to the influx of suburban-wannabe-lifestylers. But there’s effective ways to control pests, and ineffective ways, and bows are ineffective simply because of numbers. They need to be educated... good luck...

    Your mate with the .222 is onto it, 30-50 in one day is easy peasy when there’s an infestation. And an infestation needs to be smashed. Me and my wife & sons were doing those numbers last Christmas on a farm that hadn’t seen any proper pest control for years. We burned through 100 round boxes of reloads for three different rifles. Because the hunting guide that had had the hunting rights was only interested in securing $3,000 red stags for his clients, so didn’t want to shoot the place up. So it ended up in a stupid situation were there were long faces on that property that looked like they must surely be farming goats. The adjoining forest blocks have been destroyed by goats - and deer - and its a freakin’ joke all round.

    I recommend you start talking to people and get a more constructive, factual dialogue going, and get proper goat control underway.
    Bagheera likes this.
    Just...say...the...word

  15. #15
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    Bows are very safe compared to rifles.
    Flyblown is correct. To make an ecologically worthwhile dent you need a rifle.
    To really reduce them to where the bush will become ancient again you need dogs.
    This is specially the case if theres a nearby reservoir of them say in bush where you cant hunt them.
    Goats can be almost eliminated (or is it eradicated ?) but it requires consistent committment over many years ie 10-20.

 

 

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