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Thread: Planning first ever roar hunt

  1. #1
    Member square1's Avatar
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    Planning first ever roar hunt

    Just got a call from the only person I know in Auckland who also hunts, his roar plans for Wellington have fallen through so we're gonna give it a shot a little closer to home. I'm like a kid at Christmas! Now to dig out my hi viz gear...

  2. #2
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    I know its not easy but try to stay calm. What general area are you going to and when?

  3. #3
    Member square1's Avatar
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    I've calmed down now I realise how much gear I need to get first!

    Not nailed down when just yet, sometime in April. As for where, it's a toss up between a few places. To be decided this week

  4. #4
    Member Rusky's Avatar
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    I'm in the same boat as this will be my first roar. Key I'm told is to do your homework prior to the roar which has been what I've been doing all last year. I've got Sika, Fallow, and Reds on the cards. Having said that, a lot still has to go in your favor to be successful.

    Most importantly, identify your target beyond all doubt.
    falconhell likes this.

  5. #5
    Member Spook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rusky View Post
    I'm in the same boat as this will be my first roar. Key I'm told is to do your homework prior to the roar which has been what I've been doing all last year. I've got Sika, Fallow, and Reds on the cards. Having said that, a lot still has to go in your favor to be successful.

    Most importantly, identify your target beyond all doubt.
    Curious to know what this "homework" you speak of includes...this past weekend I have seen three hunters heading into the bush to do their prep work for the roar...no rifles...all three are separate from each other...two are local and one from Auckland...I got to speak to two of them and they shared their observations on deer numbers [hinds, stags and bambi's], weather patterns, air temperatures, whether the roar would be early or late this year, wallows, rubbings, stag sizes and screeds more of interesting info...none of this will be found in a book. The information you want is in the bush...a day spent there is well worth it.
    Hunt4life likes this.
    Which is worse, ignorance or apathy...I don't know and don't care.

  6. #6
    Member sako75's Avatar
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    Going on your first roar hunt is awesome. Pumping with enthusiasm, dreaming for weeks before of the perfect scenario. Much like going out on a 1st date with a hot chick you have had your eyes on for a while (even better when the day comes and you get married but that is a different story) Plan for the worse and hope for the best. Take all the gear you think you will need then see afterwards how much never got used.
    Things that work for me and lessons I have learned. Personal preferences vary
    Wind is both your best friend and worse enemy. The cool night air will drift downstream and mid morning as the day warms will turn around and travel upstream.
    Don't waste time and try to bush stalk them like other seasons. Head for the ridges and listen from there. Nothing heard then give a few roars and wait a while. Roar down the side ridges. Go down and back up if you are up high.
    When climbing a ridge, don't get out of breath and break out in a sweat. Last thing you want is to reach the top with double vision and have a stag there to meet you. Reduce your stench by not sweating as much.
    Have a set of hunting clothes. Have a set of camp clothes for around the fire. Smell them after a couple of days which is why you want a change of bed clothes (polyprops) and sleeping bag liner.
    Deer will generally be roaring throughout the night. You want to be in your hunting zone from 1st light until mid morning when they rest up.This is a good time to rest up yourselves or go back to camp and do some chores, have a feed and prep dinner for that night. In other words, chop some wood and keep a good supply in case the weather turns. Mid to late afternoon is when they start up again so you will want to be back in the zone again.
    If the day goes well and you get back to camp beaten, broken and knackered from the weight of all the meat you have and carrying a head and rifle all the way back to camp then you will appreciate having a change of clothes, a cold beer in the stream and dinner all ready to go

    Now the boring part
    You have no special powers. Once the trigger is pulled then you can not turn back time. You are responsible for your actions.
    Be humane and respect the deer. Don't rush the shot. If you can't get a killing shot and the deer moves off then cherish the moment.
    Don't shoot at sound or movement.
    Whatever you take in, carry your rubbish out

    Enjoy the time and learn from mistakes. There will always be another roar if you don't get anything

  7. #7
    OPCz Rushy's Avatar
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    Good advice Sako75.
    Hunt4life likes this.
    It takes 43 muscle's to frown and 17 to smile, but only 3 for proper trigger pull.
    What more do we need? If we are above ground and breathing the rest is up to us!
    Rule 1: Treat every firearm as loaded
    Rule 2: Always point firearms in a safe direction
    Rule 3: Load a firearm only when ready to fire
    Rule 4: Identify your target beyond all doubt
    Rule 5: Check your firing zone
    Rule 6: Store firearms and ammunition safely
    Rule 7: Avoid alcohol and drugs when handling firearms

  8. #8
    Member Hunt4life's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rushy View Post
    Good advice Sako75.
    That's probably the best advice write up I've ever read @sako75!

    I'd be keen to hunt with you anytime

  9. #9
    Member sako75's Avatar
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    During my limited roar experience, I find deer and woman are two of the same. There are no hard and fast rules to how they think. They do what they do when they want. Just when you think you have got them sussed, they will surprise you by throwing a curve ball from left field. Never let your guard down especially when you stop to rest. That cracking sound you hear may well be one trying to sneak behind your back.
    When hunting with a mate, you can take turns on the lead and you feel good about it

    Couple of roars back I saw a deer from 10m silently walking towards us. Never replied to our roaring the whole time we were on the ridge.. Looked at mate and he hadn't seen it I peered around the tree and he was standing 3m away looking straight at me. Don't know who got the biggest fright. As he bolted I took a snap shot and dropped him. Although lucky on this occasion, I should not have fired and risked an injured deer.

    I am sure a lot of us have had adrenaline filled moments and are all special in their own ways.
    I am still an amateur hunter by many standards however like everyone on this and other forums have the same thing in common, the love for the outdoors. My problem is not getting out enough

    Square1 - When you come out of the bush from your roar, analyze what you have done. Success and failure are the base to work on for the next trip. What looks good on the map is seldom what you envision when you get there so prepare for change. Having a general idea then following you nose can be quite productive.


    The gear you take for 1 week is the same as you would take for 2 nights. Food is the only varible
    square1 likes this.

  10. #10
    Member JoshC's Avatar
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    Get all of you permissions and permits sorted first. Sort out access, camping spots, identify likely valleys, gullies, terraces, slips, etc that may hold a deer. Watch the forecast, pack suitably. You don't need all the mod-cons and gadgets to hunt successfully.

    If you have a spot that you know holds deer, go there. Otherwise if you can do a pre-roar reccy trip into new country to gain an understanding of the land you are going to be hunting, as well as gauge animals numbers by the sign or animals that are there. Old rubbings and wallows etc are a good sign stags frequent a spot during the roar.

    Obviously the roar is only special because stags are usually vocal, therefore "easier to find" and will be fairly active through the day time. This doesn't mean you should aimlessly hunt throughout the day, get up early and get going at day break. If you hear stags roaring at night, try to pinpoint their location and head that way first thing. Get in their bubble, they don't like it.

    Don't be afraid to roar regularly, especially off ridge tops, terraces, into gully heads etc (anywhere your roar will carry), sometimes stags won't be vocal but will reply if you get close enough for them to hear you they are more likely to reply. Always quietly wait a while after roaring, preferably behind a stump or tree, as an older stag will often sneak in without replying, only to be spooked when he sees you move or walking away. Don't be scared to let out a roar, usually a long drawn out deep moan rather than an angry roar will get a response first. You won't spook deer by roaring at this time of year, and it'll often spark up a stag if he's on the quiet side.

    If one replies a long way off, cover the ground towards him quickly, don't fuck around and sneak. Once within a 200 odd metres of the sound of his roar, then slow down and stalk. Roar between his every now and then, keep him interested. Try and mimic the roars he's doing. If he's fired up, often he'll come straight in for a look. Stand behind a tree and wait him out somewhere you have a good view of the bush around you.

    If he continues to roar and not move, then sneak in on him quietly. Having your buddy sit back and roar while you sneak in (or vice versa) often works well, as the stag may feel less threatened and will most likely continue to roar at your mate, giving you a chance to pinpoint him and maybe get a shot in.

    In this scenario, be very clear on who is the shooter though and ideally keep in view of your mate, your mate shouldn't even have a gun ready in this position, he is the roarer, you are the shooter, and you must not shoot at anything back in the direction you have come from. Most hunting deaths have been in situations like this.

    If you get in close and are too aggressive roaring to a stag roaring half heartedly, chances are he'll sneak off. Don't give up, try and keep him roaring, and follow him with the wind in your face if possible.

    If you're hunting any catchment but more-so a small catchment be very wary of what the wind is doing, and camp in a spot where deer are unlikely to come across you or your scent. Always hunt with the wind in your favour, if stalking in on a roaring stag be even more cautious of it!

    Don't go bombing up the first deer you see, unless it is a big stag. If its a hind or a spiker, leave it, as generally if they're about a older stag won't be too far away.

    If you're hunting open country, spend lots of time behind your binos. Stags will be moving about during the day, but are most likely to be holed up in a gully or gut away until later in the evening/first light. I've spotted heaps of stags in the past by only seeing their antlers sticking out of the scrub while they chill out during the day.

    Have fun, its only a hunting trip, not the end of the world adventure. If you slow down and spend time observing animals you will learn a lot more than by shooting willy-nilly. Every hunting scenario will play out differently, and you need to think sensibly and quickly to be successful. Being fit on the hill will do wonders for your on the go thinking, and will also allow you to cover more country more comfortably...so get out for a few walks in the hills prior to your "big trip".

    The biggest and most important thing to remember when hunting in the roar is to 1000% identify your target before you line it up and pull the trigger. Don't shoot at sound, shape, or colour. You should be able to tell what sex the deer is, how old it is, how many points are on its head and most importantly its not a person! You can't pull bullets back.

    Have fun, good luck.
    Rusky, Hunt4life, square1 and 1 others like this.
    I'm drawn to the mountains and the bush, it's where life is clear, where the world makes the most sense.

  11. #11
    Member square1's Avatar
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    Whoa look at all of this! Thanks a bunch guys, heaps of helpful info there Having such limited experience probably makes it a bit more daunting than it is for you lot, nothing like getting out there to improve the confidence though. Once we nail down a place to go we will be doing a bit of recon, the more you know eh

 

 

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