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Thread: Stalled net gun project

  1. #16
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    @Chippychow for the the effort in trying to catch them live having to keep them in a (goat) stock proof paddock till the works will take them or a goat buyer will pick them up you might find it easy to shoot them for pet food. There is a guy out ormond that buys goats etc not bad money i heard. In saying that there's nothing like finishing a project.

  2. #17
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    inter net
    Boaraxa, Marty Henry and Tommy like this.
    Use enough gun

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by 40mm View Post
    inter net
    slight booboothere@40mm-Think he wants em in the net!
    BTWhows the bofors project coming on -course if you used that on goats well its instant dog tucker fullstop!

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by berg243 View Post
    what about a trailer net from supercheap
    That could be interesting. Sounds like a fair idea for a first attempt and worth a try. Only one issue that I can see; I know how hard it is to untangle these when it was sitting in a boot for a week, let alone with an angry animal wrapped up in it.....

  5. #20
    R93
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    We made or had our nets made. Heavy cordage is all you need. (Para cord would work fine) Squares were around 6x6" and net was around 12 foot square. Tied like a fishing net. Bolts were just bar and had a recess for a common O ring seal we replaced every now and then. Greased every load.

    Blanks were varying loads of 308 but a crimp die/tool worked best. (I worked up from around 45 gr of 748 and pretty sure I was over 50 when done) Correctly packing the net is most important. When we lost our crimp die I got one off Robbie Tiffen iirc. He knew where to source one or he gave us his one.

    I still have it somewhere. Not keen to lend it to use but you are more than welcome to get it copied if I find it.
    Most operators used pliers and wax but not as good as a proper crimp when they are rattling around in the machine.

    As Brads says it is best to get someone else to fire it

    I had ours running pretty mild loads and still got good throws and distance required but they still rattled your teeth and could ding the door sill of the machine when they threw you back into it


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    BRADS, A330driver, Mathias and 1 others like this.
    Do what ya want! Ya will anyway.

  6. #21
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    Our nets were made by a fisherman who made nets for many of the operators in our area, just over the hill from you at Ohope Beach. Material used was white flat nylon cord that held its knots better than the round section and was more flexible so it draped over the deer better. Dyneema would likely be worth a try as it would be lighter and have less drag due to the smaller diameter of the cord for the same strength. Benefits would be less recoil as you could use lighter weights, higher velocity, greater range. Size of our nets was 3.6m (12 foot) square with 150mm (6") mesh to allow them to penetrate small openings and minimise opportunity to snag on vegetation causing them to pull off the animal prior to its neck and legs becoming entangled. Particularly small diameter high strength cord will increase the likelihood of cuts being inflicted, however a goat is typically a lot lighter than a deer and not as strong so maybe not a worry.

    We used shotgun powder for propellant, Win 452AA or Win 700X; 30 gr of 452AA or 27 gr of 700X capped off with a small blob of silicone (elephant snot), in a high use situation crimps will cause the case necks to split. Don't try these loads in your guns right off, you may never go that far, the information is historical - like you'd get from a museum. Weights were 100mm of 18mm round bar with a chain link welded on one end to attach to the ties on each corner of the net, no o-rings just a small indentation in the base of each barrel above the splitter to retain them when you dropped them in.

    Our net guns were of all steel construction built off Mauser action 308's and had a pistol grip only with a very wide opening trigger guard to save the meat on your fingers, and the bones as well. Barrels were likewise of steel but I have seen some, like yours, constructed of aluminium in later years. Your coupling looks like a CP or hydraulic coupling; I haven't had experience using one of these in this application and figure that it would probably be worth talking to someone that has experience prior to putting it to the test as there is a significant shock loading developed when your charge meets with around 0.8 kgs of stationary steel weights. Definitely wear gloves when firing and probably safety glasses until you are confident that you are not going to get any blowback. I've seen a lot of physical damage suffered by man and machine at the behest of net-guns. When loading the net into the canister lay the net out flat on the ground and remember to insert the bottom two weights in the canister first, the body of the net next and last the top weights so that it leaves the gun in the optimum pattern.

    Your means of retaining the net in the canister was common in the South Island, most operators here used around 3 strips of masking tape applied horizontally and vertically across the face of the net and adhering to the canister to retain it. The tape was also handy when operating in areas where farmers were prone to becoming distracted from their normal farming routines, off duty Police officers were jealously guarding their pet hunting spots, and Forest Service (pre DOC) rangers ventured to uphold the law of the land, @R93 probably gets the picture.

    We only ever caught a half dozen or so goats; they were scarpering for the bush when we were miles away, got in close and they stuck their heads in the fern to "hide", my shooter jumped out, lifted their tails to check for value and proceeded to tie up the nannies. Some operators caught thousands as live capture of deer tapered off in the late eighties, for me the half dozen was enough - I figured that there had to be a more noble means of making a living than that.
    308, Husky1600, Tommy and 1 others like this.
    Just going to take a look around the next bend...

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigbear View Post
    @Chippychow for the the effort in trying to catch them live having to keep them in a (goat) stock proof paddock till the works will take them or a goat buyer will pick them up you might find it easy to shoot them for pet food. There is a guy out ormond that buys goats etc not bad money i heard. In saying that there's nothing like finishing a project.

    Catching them live is defiantly going to be more work but probably three times the fun, I think if there alive you can sell them without getting in trouble?? I could be wrong on that. I have sold them to him in the past but you need at least 30 big Billy’s to make it worth it specially by the time you cover your costs and spilt it up amoung three guys

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by 38 South View Post
    Our nets were made by a fisherman who made nets for many of the operators in our area, just over the hill from you at Ohope Beach. Material used was white flat nylon cord that held its knots better than the round section and was more flexible so it draped over the deer better. Dyneema would likely be worth a try as it would be lighter and have less drag due to the smaller diameter of the cord for the same strength. Benefits would be less recoil as you could use lighter weights, higher velocity, greater range. Size of our nets was 3.6m (12 foot) square with 150mm (6") mesh to allow them to penetrate small openings and minimise opportunity to snag on vegetation causing them to pull off the animal prior to its neck and legs becoming entangled. Particularly small diameter high strength cord will increase the likelihood of cuts being inflicted, however a goat is typically a lot lighter than a deer and not as strong so maybe not a worry.

    We used shotgun powder for propellant, Win 452AA or Win 700X; 30 gr of 452AA or 27 gr of 700X capped off with a small blob of silicone (elephant snot), in a high use situation crimps will cause the case necks to split. Don't try these loads in your guns right off, you may never go that far, the information is historical - like you'd get from a museum. Weights were 100mm of 18mm round bar with a chain link welded on one end to attach to the ties on each corner of the net, no o-rings just a small indentation in the base of each barrel above the splitter to retain them when you dropped them in.

    Our net guns were of all steel construction built off Mauser action 308's and had a pistol grip only with a very wide opening trigger guard to save the meat on your fingers, and the bones as well. Barrels were likewise of steel but I have seen some, like yours, constructed of aluminium in later years. Your coupling looks like a CP or hydraulic coupling; I haven't had experience using one of these in this application and figure that it would probably be worth talking to someone that has experience prior to putting it to the test as there is a significant shock loading developed when your charge meets with around 0.8 kgs of stationary steel weights. Definitely wear gloves when firing and probably safety glasses until you are confident that you are not going to get any blowback. I've seen a lot of physical damage suffered by man and machine at the behest of net-guns. When loading the net into the canister lay the net out flat on the ground and remember to insert the bottom two weights in the canister first, the body of the net next and last the top weights so that it leaves the gun in the optimum pattern.

    Your means of retaining the net in the canister was common in the South Island, most operators here used around 3 strips of masking tape applied horizontally and vertically across the face of the net and adhering to the canister to retain it. The tape was also handy when operating in areas where farmers were prone to becoming distracted from their normal farming routines, off duty Police officers were jealously guarding their pet hunting spots, and Forest Service (pre DOC) rangers ventured to uphold the law of the land, @R93 probably gets the picture.

    We only ever caught a half dozen or so goats; they were scarpering for the bush when we were miles away, got in close and they stuck their heads in the fern to "hide", my shooter jumped out, lifted their tails to check for value and proceeded to tie up the nannies. Some operators caught thousands as live capture of deer tapered off in the late eighties, for me the half dozen was enough - I figured that there had to be a more noble means of making a living than that.

    Thanks for the information you’ve definitely given me some ideas, I will probably try make up a para cord net 3.6m is probably a bit big seeing as I’ll be shooting from foot or a 4x4, the stress on the tie ropes is defiantly a problem when trying to get the net moveing from out of the net retainer, I have tried firing a few nets from it but end up losing the weights from snaped ropes, I like the chain link idea saves me time in making the weights especially at the rate I’m losing them. Any idea on average distance I should be able to launch a net out of one of these just as somthing to go by I’m not sure what to be expecting.

  9. #24
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    Just remember that the spread of the net depends on the angle that the barrels are set in the splitter; so narrow angle requires more distance to achieve full spread, wide angle and the net spreads quickly. Once the net is fully spread the resultant drag and inevitable directional change made by the weights then pulling against each other slow it quite quickly. So there's a happy medium to be struck between net size, intended range, barrel spread angle, and charge - plus what beating you're happy to tolerate.
    With narrow angle barrels most of the animals are captured with the net not yet fully open, this way it gets to the target fast, doesn't need much of a clear space around the animal, but uses its full size to entrap it. Once nets get too small you will start getting increased numbers of escapees. For your ties to secure the weights to the net corners uses a loop of heavier cord than that used for the net construction that works out just a little longer than your barrels, they take a beating from hitting rocks, stones and the like so always check them for damage while reloading. In your circumstances twenty metres would probably be as far as you could expect to be able to pull a shot off. From helicopters most deer were caught between five and twenty metres but with a lot more variables of speed and angle than you are likely to encounter.
    Just going to take a look around the next bend...

  10. #25
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    sounds like a fun project but if you are on the ground & your net opens 3 or 4 meters youd have to be lucky the bottom of the net doesn't hit the ground before it hits the goat...let alone any scrub !! , maaaate grab a collie after a while it will even find your goats for you

  11. #26
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    Where are you located mate? I’ve got a selection of nets, weights and barrels that I’m not likely to use again and may be persuaded to part with.

  12. #27
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    Sorry, I see you are Gizzy, I’m offshore at the mo but should be home in whakatane over Christmas, pm me if you come through.

  13. #28
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    Was talking to Nelson Collie at Status Guns in Invercargill today he said he can supply nets and he said he is the biggest manufacture of net guns in the world sending them all over the world.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by ishift4u View Post
    Was talking to Nelson Collie at Status Guns in Invercargill today he said he can supply nets and he said he is the biggest manufacture of net guns in the world sending them all over the world.
    Ok thanks iv brought a whole lot of para cord so I may aswell try make my own seeing as iv got it but if it doesnít work Iíll have look at buying one


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  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chippychow View Post
    Yea I did but there rectangular otherwise I would give it a go, the other on was a dyneema hand casting net but itís round a bit of money to spend just to ďtryĒ if it works
    @Chippychow

    What is the problem with a rectangular net? It seems an advantage to have a rectangular net when shooting it from ground level -- just make sure the short sides are to your right right and left! I'd try and find orange netting, what with colour blind animals still being spooked by seeing white, saves you hassle trying to hide the net behind those orange flaps.

    Here is a link with some net guns. Useful cones to hold the net safe within. See also the suspended net capture device - useful with bait perhaps for your goats even though it would be a shame to abandon the project.

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