Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Create Account now to join.
  • Login:

Welcome to the NZ Hunting and Shooting Forums.

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.

DPT Sarvo


User Tag List

+ Reply to Thread
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 46 to 56 of 56
Like Tree82Likes

Thread: Walking Poles

  1. #46
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Mid Canterbury
    Posts
    1,388
    Quote Originally Posted by dannyb View Post
    Yuk your durastuff has no soul.....
    Yeah....but if it works....and it is a cheap way of finding out....relatively speaking anyway.

    Cheers
    Phil

  2. #47
    Not even Banned ow dannyb's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Oxford, North Canterbury
    Posts
    3,989
    Quote Originally Posted by Phil_H View Post
    Yeah....but if it works....and it is a cheap way of finding out....relatively speaking anyway.

    Cheers
    Phil
    Manuka poles are free....what's cheaper than that ? Yuk broom stick
    Steve123 and Phil_H like this.
    #DANNYCENT

  3. #48
    Member ROKTOY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Nelson
    Posts
    1,950
    Retired ski poles from recycle centres, Downside is they are one piece and can bend if they take a solid hit, upside they are cheap and can handle a good load, offer bit of hand protection too , A larger mate of mine uses them every tramp as walking poles cannot support his weight.
    Moa Hunter likes this.

  4. #49
    Member Savage1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Whangarei
    Posts
    3,073
    Manuka poles etc are great, but cannot be loaded in the same way as a good purpose built pole with a hand strap, unless you have forearms like popeye. The hand straps are essential and you can fully load the pole without gripping the handle hard if you put the straps on properly, see the picture below.

    The other issue is the amount of grip, good walking poles have a tungsten tip on them which grips on angled rocks, a manuka pole would not provide nearly the same amount of stability in the rocky areas.

    Name:  MSR_PoleUsage-600x139.jpg
Views: 91
Size:  18.7 KB
    Phil_H likes this.

  5. #50
    Not even Banned ow dannyb's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Oxford, North Canterbury
    Posts
    3,989
    Quote Originally Posted by Savage1 View Post
    Manuka poles etc are great, but cannot be loaded in the same way as a good purpose built pole with a hand strap, unless you have forearms like popeye. The hand straps are essential and you can fully load the pole without gripping the handle hard if you put the straps on properly, see the picture below.

    The other issue is the amount of grip, good walking poles have a tungsten tip on them which grips on angled rocks, a manuka pole would not provide nearly the same amount of stability in the rocky areas.

    Attachment 163078
    Yup do it all the time, mine has a rubber foot on the bottom that is ideal for most terrains and super grippy but also cam be easily removed if a harder tip is required.

    I'm not saying they are the be all end all but they are definitely more useful than most give them credit for.

    Name:  20210319_194125.jpg
Views: 97
Size:  3.75 MB
    Savage1, ROKTOY and kukuwai like this.
    #DANNYCENT

  6. #51
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Mid Canterbury
    Posts
    1,388
    Quote Originally Posted by Savage1 View Post
    Manuka poles etc are great, but cannot be loaded in the same way as a good purpose built pole with a hand strap, unless you have forearms like popeye. The hand straps are essential and you can fully load the pole without gripping the handle hard if you put the straps on properly, see the picture below.

    The other issue is the amount of grip, good walking poles have a tungsten tip on them which grips on angled rocks, a manuka pole would not provide nearly the same amount of stability in the rocky areas.

    Attachment 163078
    Interesting.
    Any particular poles you would recommend that are available locally @Savage1 and that fill the above criteria?
    I am one of these people who prefer to be able to go and handle and play with an item before purchase, wherever possible.

    Cheers
    Phil

  7. #52
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    North Canterbury
    Posts
    3,313
    Quote Originally Posted by Savage1 View Post
    Manuka poles etc are great, but cannot be loaded in the same way as a good purpose built pole with a hand strap, unless you have forearms like popeye. The hand straps are essential and you can fully load the pole without gripping the handle hard if you put the straps on properly, see the picture below.

    The other issue is the amount of grip, good walking poles have a tungsten tip on them which grips on angled rocks, a manuka pole would not provide nearly the same amount of stability in the rocky areas.

    Attachment 163078
    A lot of people think that a mustering stick is used and held with one hand swinging it out like a walking pole. This could not be further from the truth, a mustering stick is correctly held with both hands shoulder width apart in an opposed palm grip. For descending a steep slope, the stick is behind pressed down. The hand behind the body faces down and the one in front faces up. Bend the knees, lean back into the stick and run down the hill in foot long steps, keeping the knees bent. The opposed hands keep a constant down force on the stick so that it acts as suspension
    BRADS likes this.
    'Bother' said Pooh, as he chambered another round ... Wong Far King Way

  8. #53
    Member Shearer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Tasman
    Posts
    4,248
    In my experience, compared to two, one pole does fuck all when it comes to propelling you forward and when descending you can take the load off your knees and move much more quickly with two because you can always have one on the ground. One strong pole (heavy stick) is helpful for stability when sideling steep terrain but it has to be fairly long and that becomes a pain in the arse when you are not using it.
    Experience. What you get just after you needed it.

  9. #54
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Mid Canterbury
    Posts
    1,388
    Quote Originally Posted by Shearer View Post
    In my experience, compared to two, one pole does fuck all when it comes to propelling you forward and when descending you can take the load off your knees and move much more quickly with two because you can always have one on the ground. One strong pole (heavy stick) is helpful for stability when sideling steep terrain but it has to be fairly long and that becomes a pain in the arse when you are not using it.
    Yes, last night out on the side of a hill playing with my "BroomStick" I concluded that with the rifle in a scabbard, heavy load on your back, both hands free and on some steep terrain, a mustering stick is invaluable. It is from previous experience really good for crossing rivers.

    At most other times I think I would find it a pain in the arse, but that's probably more to do with my style of hunting - when I'm not just sitting somewhere to ambush game. I try and keep my rifle in my hands when hunting. No bloody use to you over your shoulder when you surprise some game. Also the stick strapped to my pack when negotiating bush would also be unhelpful.

    My initial thoughts at this time....for myself only....a musterer's stick would be more use to me if I was in the tops but as I spend more time lower down I think one, or maybe two light but strong walking poles folded an in or on the pack would serve me better. I would be more inclined to use them coming out of the bush with a load than going in to the bush or climbing.

    Just my thoughts and experience so far. Still open to ideas and will keep an open mind and play with different poles and techniques.

    Cheers
    Phil

  10. #55
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Mangakino
    Posts
    829
    My father always used a walking stick when mustering.
    I am pretty sure he and his mates knew how to use them.
    His two older brothers had Coronet Peak and he worked all the stations in the area.
    They mustered sheep out of some pretty knarly stuff.
    Look at the face of the Remarkables and imagine walking all over it.
    The big advantage off walking poles over the stick is the ability to shorten when not using.

  11. #56
    Member Cordite's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    NZ Mainland (Dunedin)
    Posts
    5,060
    Quote Originally Posted by dannyb View Post
    Yup do it all the time, mine has a rubber foot on the bottom that is ideal for most terrains and super grippy but also cam be easily removed if a harder tip is required.

    I'm not saying they are the be all end all but they are definitely more useful than most give them credit for.

    Attachment 163081
    If you want a harder tip for when you have the rubber foot removed, epoxy metal in a broken HSS drill bit (tip, not shank, as the shank is not hardened).
    Last edited by Cordite; 20-03-2021 at 10:15 AM.
    Phil_H and dannyb like this.
    "I find television very educating. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book." Groucho Marx

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Trekking Poles/Walking Sticks
    By janleroux in forum Gear and Equipment
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 06-07-2020, 10:35 PM
  2. Trekking Poles
    By Ground Control in forum Gear and Equipment
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 08-11-2018, 06:15 PM
  3. Hiking poles, whos uses them?
    By Ryan_Songhurst in forum Gear and Equipment
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 01-04-2016, 05:52 PM
  4. walking poles
    By ANTSMAN in forum Gear and Equipment
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 01-06-2015, 09:47 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Welcome to NZ Hunting and Shooting Forums! We see you're new here, or arn't logged in. Create an account, and Login for full access including our FREE BUY and SELL section Register NOW!!