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Thread: Getting back to living off the land.....

  1. #61
    Member ROKTOY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coote View Post
    ...I have some perennial Egyptian Walking Onions...
    ....I figure if you are going to have trees or shrubs on your property you may as well be producing fruit. I've trained several trees as espaliers, and I've grafted my apple trees to have more than one variety on them. My best 'keeper' apple is Court Pendu Plat.
    Coote, We grow the walking onions, they are a great grower for us too, I like them fried next to my steak.
    Would you be interested in sharing a piece of your Court Pendu Plat tree, I would love to add it to my apple tree.

  2. #62
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    I'd be delighted to give you some Court Pendu Plat cuttings. I just have to remember to cut them in July or early August. If you want to PM me your contact details I will make a note. Feel free to remind me nearer the time.

    I've also got Blenheim Orange which was fairly rare for a while, but it has been shared around a bit now and I think I've even seen nursery trees labelled as Blenheim Orange.
    ROKTOY likes this.

  3. #63
    Member ROKTOY's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coote View Post
    I'd be delighted to give you some Court Pendu Plat cuttings. I just have to remember to cut them in July or early August. If you want to PM me your contact details I will make a note. Feel free to remind me nearer the time.

    I've also got Blenheim Orange which was fairly rare for a while, but it has been shared around a bit now and I think I've even seen nursery trees labelled as Blenheim Orange.
    Thank you, I will flick you a message.
    I used to have a good collection of older and heritage apples, but have sadly lost access to a lot of them, Time to start again.

  4. #64
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    Some local Taranaki doofus is on Radio NZ.....
    https://www.rnz.co.nz/national/progr...arden-of-eatin

  5. #65
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    So that's you Bumblefoot ! Now I know somebody famous !! I look forward to listening to the talk. The written introduction really grabbed my attention. Thanks for sharing.

  6. #66
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    Is that a bunch of 'Fartichoke greens in you arms Bumblefoot ?
    'Bother' said Pooh, as he chambered another round ... Wong Far King Way

  7. #67
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    That was a great interview. Hopefully it will inspire someone, somewhere to grow some veggies or to learn more about hunting. The world needs more of this down-to-earth approach to living.

    We've got quite a bit in common... you are the first person I've come across who eats broad bean greens (other than my wife and I).... and I once had the hots for Felicity Kendall.

    Your warmth and enthusiasm are obvious. Folks like you must be helping to make the world a better place. Good on you.

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moa Hunter View Post
    Is that a bunch of 'Fartichoke greens in you arms Bumblefoot ?
    Sure are; the pigs and ducks love the leafy tops
    Moa Hunter likes this.

  9. #69
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    Thanks for the kind words Coote. I just bumble and fumble my way through life. At my age not so much of the fumbling!
    Coote likes this.

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by ROKTOY View Post
    Coote, We grow the walking onions, they are a great grower for us too, I like them fried next to my steak.
    @Coote, @ROKTOY, I mentioned the walking onions to Sharon and after she looked them up she announced that we already have some. They had been given to her by her mother as a novelty plant and she knew them as tree onions.

    We are breaking in a new piece of ground for gardens so they will be one of the new crops Sharon will try.

    Cheers
    Phil
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  11. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by bumblefoot View Post
    Some local Taranaki doofus is on Radio NZ.....
    https://www.rnz.co.nz/national/progr...arden-of-eatin
    @bumblefoot, it good to see some doofus up there in Taranaki doing his stuff. The world needs more doofus's and old plonkers to give this world a bit of reality.

    Just on a light aside, Sharon used to run a blog called "The Domestic Plonkers' where she used to relate our journey on the land together in the country. At the end of the day she only had so many hours in the day so let it go to concentrate on more Plonkerish tasks on the land.

    Maggots! Yes you have revived my interest in them @bumblefoot. I have always entertained maggots and meal worms and in time will start a project with the meal worms. However, after your good idea with regard to road-kill, next time in town I shall be buying a bucket with a lid and collecting some dead carrion to start producing maggots for the chooks. If nothing, it may stop them getting in the way foraging for fresh huhu grubs when I am out splitting rounds.

    Cheers
    Phil
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  12. #72
    HOO
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    Is the no knead bread similar to a Boule? It’s a French style bread I used to make a lot of. Leave it overnight and make rolled balls into “gluten cloaks” I think they were called. Was beautiful bread. I should get back into making it


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  13. #73
    HOO
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    https://www.hummingbirdhigh.com/2013...boule.html?m=1

    Pretty sure this was the recipe I used to make


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Phil_H likes this.

  14. #74
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    Part of living off the land for myself and Sharon isn’t just about the food. It’s also heating. The only heating in the house that we are required to live in has two woodburners as the only means of heating. One of the burners has a wetback which is great. We are lucky to be living in an area where we can go and help out farmers by removing wind blown trees for them. We are also fortunate, at present to have so much wood available we can deliver wood to pensioners around the district who can do with a bit of help for their winter months.

    The current wood that I am getting through.

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    The woodshed to the right is also full of wood to head height.

    The ‘chop yard’.

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    The tools of trade.

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    When I started out doing this I purchased a Chinese no-name chainsaw. It appeared to be a copy of earlier Husqvarna’s, and to all intents and purposes, for a purchase price of $300, it was great. It was bloody reliable and though it cut wood, it was slow and chewed through the gas. Any mention of an new chainsaw was met with distain….”Why do you need another chainsaw when this one is doing the job?”

    Things changed when Sharon decided that she wanted to help with the chain sawing….you know, girls can do just the same as the boys….Well, after some less than enjoyable experiences with the old agricultural Chinese chainsaw, she decided that this task would be left for me.

    As luck would have it, the local Husqvarna was specialling their smallest 14” saw for about $400. I couldn’t resist. I bought one and presented it to Sharon as an early birthday present. Well, she tried and loved it. Suddenly the penny dropped. Spending a little more on good technology can sometimes pay great dividends. Unsolicited by me, Sharon presented me with a $1200 Husqvarna two days later.

    The splitting of the rounds I do all by hand. Whilst the local garage has an awesome diesel powered woodsplitter for hire at only $60 a day, I personally like the exercise. Sharon does all the stacking as well as 50% of the sawing when we are retrieving the logs from the paddock.. It’s bloody great working together as a team. I love it.

    Some old plonker getting some morning exercise in before heading off for a late shift.

    Name:  Wood4.jpg
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    Cheers
    Phil
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  15. #75
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    I needed a new chainsaw a while ago. I use my dad's old Jonserad, brilliant chainsaw but too heavy and dicey to use if you're limbing up a ladder etc. I asked the guy in the repair place what he recommended as a good smaller saw. He is super straight up and honest.

    He recommended the Japanese Shindaiwa. He used to sell them and reckoned they fly under the radar, he said that even the good brands build their smaller chainsaws to a lesser standard; and their really wasn't much difference between them and the el cheapo Bunnings chainsaws. Whereas Shindaiwa always build them to the same specs as their big ones.
    Gotta say it punches well above it's weight. Chews through stuff and uses bugger all gas. I'm really pleased with it.
    Phil_H likes this.

 

 

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